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Before WATCHMEN, Alan Moore made his debut in the U.S. comic book industry with the revitalization of the horror comic book THE SWAMP THING. His deconstruction of the classic monster stretched the creative boundaries of the medium and became one of the most spectacular series in comic book history. With modern-day issues explored against a backdrop of horror, SWAMP THING's stories became commentaries on environmental, political and social issues, unflinching in their relevance. SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING Book One collects issues #20-27 of this seminal series including the never-before-reprinted SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING #20, where Moore takes over as writer and concludes the previous storyline. Book One begins with the story "The Anatomy Lesson," a haunting origin story that reshapes SWAMP THING mythology with terrifying revelations that begin a journey of discovery and adventure that will take him across the stars and beyond.

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4.4 stars 4.4 Stars Average score of 4 user reviews

A Solid Four 0

The entirety of Alan Moore's run on the Swamp Thing title, which spans something like 45 issues running from 1984 to 1987, is widely known for its quality and also happens to be older than I am. With that in mind, what is there that I can say about Swamp Thing that hasn't already been said?Moore's run begins at issue #20, and it picks up from where the previous author left off and ties off loose ends. While the first issue is by no means unenjoyable, it's issue #21 that really kicks off the seri...

6 out of 6 found this review helpful.

Mature reads are rooted from here. 0

Alan Moore's Swamp Thing is ground breaking.  It is the first series to discard the Comic Code Authority and just tell stories for grown ups.  All Mature stories are Rooted in Swamp Thing.   Guts and sex are common now, but in the 80s no one could touch the Swamp Thing dealing with that.   This volume Alan Moore destroys Swamp Thing, just to reconstruct him.  This idea of changing the old character to and creating new ones from them, would inspire Neil Gaiman to create his world beloved ...

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

",,,and meet the sun!" 0

As I've said elsewhere, I'm not a fan of horror, but I am willing to give certain authors some slack in certain areas, especially Neil Gaiman and Alan Moore. I was able to check this out from the library and read it free of charge, which was a good way to sample Moore's early horror style. I'm not sure if I will go out and get the rest of his acclaimed Swamp Thing run, but I am more willing to do so now that I've sampled it here. I'm still not a fan of horror, nor am I yet one of those "Alan Moo...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.
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