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Godzilla: Gangsters & Goliaths #3 - Moth and Flame

5

Sato may have found a way to get revenge on Takahashi, by using Mothra to destroy all that Takahashi owns, but what happens to Tokyo when it becomes nothing more than chaos? What will happen to the balance?

Detective Sato may have found a way to get revenge on Takahashi, the man who he was frame murdering, which in turn led to Sato being exiled on Monster Island, by using Mothra and the Elias to destroy all that Takahashi owns, but what happens to Tokyo when it becomes nothing more than chaos? What will happen to the balance?

Aside from Mothra, Godzilla also makes his way to Tokyo to destroy some buildings as well. Mothra can't have all the fun.

The Good

IDW has two, that's right, TWO Godzilla books, and they are both really awesome. What separates this book from the other Godzilla book is that this book incorporates the world of the Tokyo criminal world, which, at first, I didn't understand how it would work, but three issues in, I feel they are a bizarre, but perfect fit for each other. This book is actually states that it takes place in a different continuity than Godzilla: kingdom of Monsters, so there's no need for confusion.

My favorite thing about this book is that it mixes two of my favorite genres: giant monsters and revenge stories. It’s like the film Taken meets well, Godzilla. We get to see a good Detective, Makoto Sato, extract his revenge on a man and all of his assets, and that’s where this book raises the bar. Sato gets his revenge by using the Elias and Mothra to destroy everything Takahashi owns. This issue features a massive amount of destruction, but too much of this destruction messes with the balance of things, and that’s where Godzilla comes into play.

John Layman is the writer on this book. You may know his work from the book Chew, which is also about a detective, but with a completely different tone. At first, I was a tad weary of this book because I have no doubt that Layman could write another great book starring a detective, but could he write it with more of a serious tone? The answer is 100% yes. Layman proves he’s versatile in his writing tone with this book. Yes, giant monsters blowing up a city is a bit goofy, but this is a serious book with some incredibly dark undertones, and it’s phenomenal.

Alberto Ponticelli’s art on Gangsters and Goliaths may not blow you away at first. You’ll notice it’s solid, but nothing to jump up and down about. After you take a second look, you’ll notice the incredible detail Ponticelli puts into each panel. It’s something you can sit back and appreciate. At one point, when we first see Godzilla, I started smiling. I’m a Godzilla fan, and I feel like Ponticelli really depicted Godzilla perfectly, just by the anger in his gigantic face.

The Bad

It’s hard to find anything bad about this book for me. I’m really trying to find something about this book that was a let down, and frankly, it’s just not there.

The Verdict

I debated back and forth between a 4 and a 5 on this issue, and I couldn’t come up with a logical reason to give this book a 4. I love this book, especially this issue. It’s a revenge story meets Godzilla, and Godzilla is always about revenge, so it truly is a perfect fit. It’s the most fun you can have for $3.99, unless you can by a Rampage arcade cabinet for $3.99, and if you do, I envy you. The writing on this book is a step away from what John Layman is doing on Chew, but it’s just as entertaining, and the art on this book is almost on par with the writing. I highly recommend this series and this issue. Come on… You know you love giant monsters blowing up things.