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wangbumaximus

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#1  Edited By wangbumaximus

Is Bruce Banner homeless also? How come Marvel or many of the character's writer fail to explore the extent of the Hulk's state of homelessness?

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wangbumaximus

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#2  Edited By wangbumaximus

In the world of visual literature, anything is possible. "Heroes"/"Superheroes" can fight the government if the former feel threatened by the latter.  As what a patriot would say it best: "Give me liberty or give me death!" Captain America/Steve Rogers once gave up his superhero persona in disgust with the American government. Superman and Batman challenged then American President Lex Luthor directly in the first issues of Superman/Batman. Of course, the competition never wants to show the public readership that the government in its entirety as the oppressor. Both Marvel and DC make sure that the "rebelling" superheroes in the given storyline to realize the follies of challenging the law. Only very radical and very independent publishers/writers dare to push the envelope in that aspect

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wangbumaximus

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#3  Edited By wangbumaximus

Truly, this movie has plenty of influences from Mark Millar's Ultimates! Hope Marvel acknowledges the bombastic Scot! Cant wait this one!

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wangbumaximus

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#4  Edited By wangbumaximus

If the death of a character is committed by a certified lunatic/crazed mind/psycho, the latter will end up in the rehabilitation/asylum/ward for most laws of the Western world stipulate that the loco person is NOT actually in his/her RIGHT frame of mind. Of course, many criminals in the real sense want to get out of the capital punishment by proclaiming of their so-called insanity. These people, most likely the rich, influential and powerful, hire top attorneys and psychological experts to assert/prove of their clients' "insanity". In many comics in the competition, that proves my point. Joker, Killer Croc, Scarecrow, etc., etc., etc., never get persecuted of being murderers, and always end up in the asylum due to their insanity.  Speaking of murderers in comics, correct me if I err, but there are no major sane villains who are actually mated the full force of the law of their respective countries. If they are jailed, many years do these scumbags endure? One or two years? What if the fans clamor their return despite the writer/s intend/s to punish them to show the world (for those who still value the sense of right and wrong/good triumphs over bad) that crime never pays, could the powers-in-the-comic-corridors ignore their customers' desire? Since resurrection is yet to be an absolute reality to our society (with the exception of Jesus Christ, Lazarus, Mohammad and those religious figures for the sake to those religious conscious people out there), murder is really intentional and brutal, we must condone the perpetrators, both the initiator/s and their accomplices. But the comics nowadays (obviously inspired from Bible, myths, and other fantastic literature that deal on the aspect revival) treat death/murder so economically, if not in the sense of being blunt here: cheaply. The murderers of these resurrected heroes, in the context/imagination of their worlds/author/s, take advantage of manipulating the situation since there are NO laws dealing with resurrected murdered victims. Influences are so strong in the pages of comics from the real world even though both the writers and the illustrators can create/imagine a fictional scenario. Yet, acting as a devil's advocate here, if there are laws in the real world regarding this matter, I believe many comic writers will try to think twice or many times to spice up their respective stories. Of course, I personally align with others that these murderous rogues should be punished, regardless whether their victims died permanently or otherwise. But in comics, most particularly in the competition, the twisted plot continues to be twisted further, and that includes eluding justice for these cabals!

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wangbumaximus

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#5  Edited By wangbumaximus

Good and evil, the greatest dual elements in our human sub and consciousness. The targets audience of the comic competition are basically children and adolescences. Naturally, the parents of the former want to portray them that "good" always win over the forces of "evil", and the competition knows this premise and the marketability of being "good"/"hero". Many literature follow this pattern for the longest time. However, we must admit that the price of being "good" is at the expense of "evil" elements. How could one "good" guy perform so heroically if there's nothing "evil" to overcome/defeat/surpass/destroy? Hence, "evil" is arguably the twin sentient of "good", though highly underrated/overrated/misunderstood/misconceived. It also enhances the storyline further since it gives the "goodies" something worth seeking, fighting and improving. If the "evil" character portrays beyond the stereotypical basis of "evil" (bullies, bad guys, gang members, dictators, etc), a highly interesting read I say. Sad to say, the basic notion of "good" deeds surpass "evil" is still an economical norm for the competition, unlike in the classical Greek setup where tragedy ("evil" somehow trumped "good") was the cup of tea amongst the classical geeks. Yes, "evil" can spice up the event, just like what happened during the "Dark Reign" saga, and further intrigue the current storyline, in addition to the question of why this "evil" character becomes this and that. Yet nonetheless, "good" still wins! Barf!

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wangbumaximus

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#6  Edited By wangbumaximus

I disagree on the author's assumption on the identity of Dr. Hurt to Darkseid. Did Morrison publicly admit this? Moreover, I don't know with you, but as long the title Batman remains profitable for DC, being a "god" for me is null and academic for Batman per se is one of the most enduring ICONS in most people around the world even before Morrison further complicates the Dark Crusader. Batman is part of the MYTHOLOGY in the most modern sense. And, Bruce Wayne/Batman since the end of Knight Fall epic is no loner.  He seeks assistance if things are really beyond his control. Furthermore, the readers still love the Bats, thus the mythology of the Caped Crusader never ends! Nonetheless, good analysis on the Joker's facade on Sexton.

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wangbumaximus

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#7  Edited By wangbumaximus

Very interesting article. Grant Morrison said his explanations for an article in Wizard Magazine two or three years ago. However, Morrison tends to begin with a big scenario, then he follows on the process of deconstructing the big picture into smaller pieces that are literally littered/scattered virtually all pages.  His style are very evident in most of his works, like the Invisibles and Doom Patrol.  However, unlike many writers who first finish their entire story before executing in the visual pages, I believe his story is still incomplete for he tends to delay the series in the middle of an event, just like what happened in both Final Crisis and Batman and Robin. For the uninitiated, he is definitely confusing, an elitist of his own craft. Yet, just like many famous very-hard-to-understand and often-misunderstood intellectuals (Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, etc), readers should practice re-reading and reflecting what he tries to pull-off.  The most thought-provoking part of this article is the last part! That makes sense, Dude!

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