The Harlan Ellison Comics Bibliography

This is a bibliography of all of the comics work of Harlan Ellison. I'm a huge fan of Ellison's work, and he's had a lot of influence over some of the best writers and artist in the comics industry. Though he's sold much of it off to pay for medical and legal expenses, at one time Ellison's comic book collection spanned many generations. He is a huge supporter of independent comic book creators, and has numbered as his friends such comics luminaries as Neil Gaiman, Neil Adams, Julie Schwartz, Len Wein, Jim Steranko, Jim Valentino, Paul Chadwick... the list goes on.

List items

  • This criminally short lived series was Harlan's dream project and pretty much more than any Ellison fan could ever want. A rotating who's who of the best creators in comics adapted many of Ellison's best stories to comics form. *Ellison was so upset with John Byrne's loose adaptation of his classic story, "I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream", that he had Dark Horse run installments of his original text story alongside Byrne's adaptation for comparison.

  • Letter printed. Wordsmith is a story about a 1940s pulp fiction writer. Needless to say, Ellison was intrigued.

  • IDW's adaptation of Ellison's original Teleplay with some parts taken from Edward Bryant's excellent novelization of same.

  • This issue is the first half of a two part story that concludes with The Incredible Hulk #140.The original plot treatment was actually first published in Marvel's in house fanzine Marvelmania #4. Be warned, this issue suffers from early 70s Marvel cheesiness, and Roy Thomas is a nutter about working Ellison story titles and veiled Lovecraft references into his dialogue. The upshot is the great artwork by Sal Buscema.

  • This issue says in the indica that it's based on an original story by Ellison, but I'll be damned if I know which one. It looks to me like it's an original treatment gussied up with more of that madcap Roy Thomas dialogue. So until I get further info, I'm going with original.

  • So, here's how this one works out. Harlan Ellison approached Jim Warren about doing a story around the next Frank Frazetta cover they published. Ostensibly, the story would be broken down into comics form and then run in whichever Warren magazine sported the cover. The cover xerox was sent to Ellison, Ellison wrote the story, and Neal Adams broke it all down into a finished comics piece which ran in Creepy #32. This story was reprinted later in Harlan Ellison's Dream Corridor.

  • Ellison actually wrote this issue as a favor to Denny O'Neil who was going into hospital for a bit. He drafted fellow scribe Arthur Byron Cover who was more up to date with Daredevil, and the rest is one of DD's cooler issues that doesn't have the name Miller attached. It has kind of a People Under The Stairs/Murderworld vibe to it, with a nice little twist at the end that handily sets up the next issue.

  • The follow up to last issue, where Arthur Byron Cover finishes what Ellison Started.

  • This issue is the result of a 15 year old promise by Ellison to Julie Schwartz to write him a Batman script. I'm not sure if it was worth a 15 year wait, but it is a neat self contained story chronicling the strangest night of Batman's life.

  • From A To Z In The Chocolate Alphabet is kind of legendary in that Ellison wrote it (along with several others) in the window of A Change of Hobbit Bookstore in Los Angeles. One of the pastiche stories "N is for Nemotropin" is based on a painting by the superb Underground Comix artist and Vaughn Bode protege, Larry Todd. The painting served as part of the inspiration for the story, and several years later Last Gasp Eco-Funnies published Todd's fully illustrated version of Ellison's story.

  • Ellison contributed a 3 page story starring Wolverine. There's a story Ellison tells that he was so in love with Miller's artwork for his story that he had high quality stat copies made to hang in his office. Somewhere along the way Marvel lost the art for the story prior to publication, so they bought Ellison's copies. Years later, the artwork resurfaced, and Marvel sent it to Ellison as a thank you. So, not only does he own the original art, but Marvel actually paid him for the privilege. What Frank Miller has to say about that is not currently on record.

  • Part 2 of the story that starts off in Avengers #88. The publication date of this issue is April 1st and as a parnk of sorts, Roy Thomas worked pretty much the entire contents pages of two of Ellison's short story collections into the dialogue and caption copy of this issue. Chris Day, the master archivist of all things Sequential Ellison threw down a bit of a challenge to see how many a sharp eyed reader could spot. For anyone who's interested check out my blog post about it here on Comic Vine. I'd do it here but there's this whole limited space issue thing.

  • An adaptation of Ellison's short story "Delusion For A Dragon Slayer", oddly re-titled "Delusions For A Dragon Slayer", by Gerry Conway and Syd Shores.

  • An adaptation of Ellison's original unedited teleplay for the Outer Limits episode of the same name by the late, great Marshall Rogers.

  • These special issues of DC Comics Presents were conceived as a memorial to the great editor Julie Schwartz shortly after his death in 2004. Julie was famous for commissioning special concept covers from his artists to help spur story creativity in his writers. Jose Louis Garcia Lopez re-created the cover to Justice League of America #53 and Ellison turned in a sad and strange story that pitted Julie against his stable of comic book heroes.

  • Contains an adaptation of Ellison's story "Run For The Stars", by Ellison and Ken Steacy.

  • Contains an adaptation of Ellison's story, "Life Hutch", by Ellison and Ken Steacy.

  • Contains a memorial for Julie Schwartz written by Ellison for this series.

  • This was a bizarre attempt by Marvel to get into the digest sized magazine game. The book consisted of text stories with single page illustrations tacked on at the end. Ellison's story, "Neon" was printed with the last two pages reversed. They corrected the mistake and ran the story again in the next issue.

  • The corrected version of Ellison's short story "Neon", reprinted from issue #1. Both versions of the story have an end page artwork by Walt Simonson.

  • Contains an introduction by Ellison, an adaptation of his teleplay, "Crazy as a Soup Sandwich" by Ellison and Neal Adams, and a text printing of Ellison's short story, "Darkness Upon The Face of the Deep."

  • Contains an adaptation of Ellison's story, "Repent Harlequin! Said the Tick Tock Man," by Roy Thomas and Alex Nino.

  • Contains an adaptation of Ellison's short story "Mealtime", re-titled "Upheaval." This is Ellison's first actual published comics work (ie. not a letter.) The story boasts some stellar art by Al Williamson.

  • This issue contained a humorous text piece illustrated by Basil Wolverton, and written by Ellison.

  • Introduction by Ellison, extolling the virtues of the Oz mythos.

  • This was the last regular issue of Fish Police before Marvel began reprinting it. Ellison wrote the "outroduction."

  • Introduction by Ellison. This was a benefit book for Omaha's creator Reed Waller that came out during his fight with cancer.

  • Introduction by Ellison.

  • A long introduction by Ellison that explains why Dave Stevens was a man out of time.

  • Introduction by Ellison.

  • Contains an adaptation of Ellison's story, "Sleeping Dogs", by Ellison and Ken Steacy.

  • Introduction by Ellison comparing Grey to the more nihilistic elements of his own work.

  • Bill Mantlo, Sal Buscema and Kim DeMulder do a straight up adaptation of Ellison's Outer Limits teleplay "Soldier" which they re-titled "Hero." There was only one little hitch with this issue, and that was that not only was Ellison never contacted about the adaptation, but he wasn't even credited in the issue. Ellison contacted Marvel's vice president after the issue's publication, and an amicable settlement was reached. Jim Shooter maintained that Ellison's credit was dropped because the book was changing editors at the time, though what that had to do with anything is anybody's guess.

  • Long introduction by Ellison, extolling the virtues of George Carlson's "Jingle Jangle Tales", of which "Mangle Tangle" is an homage.

  • Contains a short essay about ignorant people who refuse to remember their past, and the day that Harvey Kurtzman died.

  • Contains a Batman Black and White backup feature, "Funny Money" by Ellison and Gene Ha.

  • Ellison had a letter printed, wherein he extols the virtues of Paul Chadwick's Concrete.

  • Dial H For Hero was a really cool concept where you could write in an idea for a superhero and they'd publish it for you in a comic. Ellison created the character of Silver Fog used in this issue.

  • Harlan Ellison makes a brief appearance in Dave Sim's Cerebus story.

  • Reprints a letter written by Ellison that was originally published in Swamp Thing Vol. 1 #2

  • Has a letter by Harlan Ellison that succinctly defines the concept of "high art" and plants Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson firmly in that camp.

  • Has a letter printed from Harlan Ellison.

  • Ellison suggested the story title and the name of the villain for this story.

  • Faye Perozich and Kelley Jones adapted Ellison's short story, "Shattered Like A Glass Goblin" for the first issue of the short lived Weird Tales Illustrated series.

  • Contains part one of a 3 part interview that continues in The Comic Buyers Guide.

  • Contains a text printing of Ellison's short story, "How Interesting: A Tiny Man".

  • This was the first hint of the Dream Corridor series, and was published slightly before Dark Horse began the actual series.

  • In an effort to crack the bookstore market, Dark Horse revamped the Dream Corridor series into a prestige formatted mini graphic novel. This was the only one published before the series ended.

  • Ellison had a long letter of encouragement printed this issue.

  • Concrete and Larry visit the home of Susan and Dwayne Byrd. The house is modeled after Ellison Wonderland, and Susan and Harlan are The Byrds.

  • Ellison wrote a small paragraph tribute to Batman for his 50th anniversary.

  • There's a 6 page backup story titled, "The Man With The Vision" wherein the DNAgent character Amber meets a writer obviously based on Harlan Ellison. The shout line at the top of the splash page claims that the story is 83% true.

  • Two issue series by Ellison and Richard Corben adapting Ellison's novella, "A Boy and His Dog."

  • Graphic novel reprinting the original story published by Mad Dog Graphics with the addition of two new stories: the prequel, "Eggsucker" and the sequal, "Blood's A Rover" both by Ellison and Corben.

  • 4 page article detailing Ellison's Daredevil story, complete with a checklist of his comics work.

  • Ellison had a letter printed.

  • Has a review by Ellison printed on the back cover.

  • Ellison's first published written work. A letter written to Real Fact Comics and printed in issue 6. He was 13.

  • Ellison had a letter printed.

  • Ellison had a letter printed.

  • Contains the story, "Mondo Megillah" by Alabaster Redzone (Jim Stenstrum) and Alex Nino. It's a pretty direct rip-off of Ellison's novella, "A Boy and His Dog." Written without Ellison's permission. Ellison eventually sued for plagiarism and won.

  • A collection of Ellison's Kyben War stories originally printed in Marvel's Epic magazine.

  • Ellison makes a brief off camera appearance and has one of the best lines in the series.

  • Steve Gerber does a parody of different movies, one of which is based on Ellison's troubles with his The Starlost series.

  • Ellison appears in character as himself.

  • There's a quick one panel parody of Ellison at a comics convention.

  • Don Simpson's Megaton Man backup story has a parody of Ellison. It's a bit of a poison barb about Ellison's troubles with his long delayed Last Dangerous Visions Anthology.

  • An original graphic novel by Ellison and his longtime friends Paul Chadwick and Ken Steacy.

  • IDW's adaptation of the far superior original teleplay to the Star Trek episode, City on the Edge of Forever.