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#1 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

If you read the last issue of CAPTAIN MARVEL you might recall that things have changed in a big way for Carol Danvers. Without spoiling the issue, let's just say things are infinitely different for Carol than ever before, and if she wants to live, she is going to have to exhibit some serious self control.

This issue starts similarly to the last one where Carol's personal life is at the center of the story. We notice very quickly that there is a relationship between her and a character that surprises her a bit, and it's nice to see writers Kelly Sue DeConnick and Christopher Sebela incorporate him here. The issue breaks up the focus on Carol's personal life by integrating a scene where the character has to save the day. This was a good decision because if this hadn't been here the issue would have felt incredibly monotonous.

We are also introduced to Carol's new adversaries, and although they look a bit silly, it will be interesting to see whether they have anything to do with Carol's loss of powers. Is the reason she is struggling because of this new adversary, or is that just a coincidence?

The Bad

This issue feels a bit repetitive. The writer focuses heavily on the fact that Captain Marvel's power set has changed, and we get a lot of scenes featuring the character walking abound a bit annoyed and stubborn, disregarding everything everyone around her is saying. However, even though she is told not to do something in this issue, we see her do it regardless. It would have made more sense if something were to have happened to Carol the moment she tried to fly, but we don't really see that. Rather than showing us the character really suffer the effects of her illness, we just see characters talk about it. This is all well and good but it would have been better to incorporate that as an action in the story as opposed to simply stating it for the reader.

The Verdict

This issue follows in the same vein as the previous issue of CAPTAIN MARVEL. It really explores the character on a more personal level which is something I found really interesting. In it we see Carol's personality shine a little bit and get a glimpse at her hard-headedness and stubbornness. We also see that there are people in Carol's life that are important to her and are looking out for her, and both these things were great. Having said that, this issue doesn't feel like it rides the high that the last issue ended with. Things could have been a bit more dramatic and we could have seen Carol literally suffer after attempting to fly. The issue ends on a pretty dramatic note which is good, but a big chunk of what happens in the middle could have been a bit better.

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#2 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

Three Thor's from three different points in time attempt to eradicate The God Butcher, but will they succeed? This story has been very interesting. We were initially introduced to this murderer of the Gods very briefly, and I really like the way the story has unfolded gradually. It is now, in the fifth issue that we get a closer look at the adversary of this story and a peek at not only who he is but also at what his motives are. His "dream of a Godless Age" is really a rather interesting concept that goes far deeper than just this surface notion that Gods should die. He has a reason for it, for this desire to eliminate them and it is something that we see here in this issue at the very start of the story.

It is interesting to see the three versions of Thor's character (young, middle aged and old) interact in this issue, each one fighting together against a common enemy. It is clear the character aged and matured over time, and it is interesting to see that play out here in this issue. We also see the battle between these two characters take place over an extended period of time. This killer has come after Thor time and again, and we get to see that replayed over and over.

The art, once again, is really beautiful. The colors are perfect to tell this somber story, and some of the close ups of the characters capture the raw emotion of Thor's character in the midst of battle in a fantastic way. It's really well done with these light inks and these light colors.

The Bad

There are moments that are definitely confusing because the story jumps around between time periods and it can sometimes be difficult to understand at first what is going on. In this way, the story feels a bit disorganized. Once you reach the end, however, things improve and the story makes a bit more sense.

The Verdict

This is an interesting issue because it brings Thor from three different points in his existence together to work towards a common goal. The result is this rather interesting story that gives readers a perspective of how the character has evolved over time, and how his manner of fighting has changed. In addition to this we get a closer look at who the God Butcher is and what his motives are, which makes for a rather interesting story. Pretty art and an interesting story makes this a solid issue. I would recommend picking up the previous four to really get a better understanding of what is happening in this story.

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#3 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

One of the things I have been enjoying about this series has bee writer Mike Johnson's grasp on Supergirl and who she is. This issue exemplifies the fact that Kara is a reckless, young, broken woman who is passionate about one goal: to bring back her home planet. I think Johnson captures that really well in this issue in the way that Kara's actions are so reckless. She is hard-headed and stubborn and she refuses to listen to reason, I think that's important. It also makes sense that Kara would be acting and feeling in this way since she has lost absolutely everything. Johnson has Kara's character down really, really well there is no question about that.

There were a few good segue's where we get to see exactly what is happening outside of Supergirl's battle with Wonder Woman. We catch a glimpse at the "bigger picture," and although it would have been nice to see more of that, it was still good that some of those moments broke up the fight between Supergirl and Diana.

The Bad

I know that this is not a Wonder Woman comic, but the way she was written even on the very first page of the issue is so out of character that it feels really jarring. In most cases something like this really wouldn't matter since this title isn't hers, but I think it's important here because of the role Wonder Woman plays to the plot as a whole. Here she proposes a counter argument to Kara where she explains that Krypton is gone and "nothing can bring it back."

The symbol on H'el's chest is something that is alluded to in this issue but not really explored. It is something Kara notices very briefly and addresses quickly before she seemingly changes her mind out of the blue. This is what was strange: she had been holding on to her convictions throughout the last three issues of her series and then all of a sudden she flips a switch and changes her mind. I almost felt like she should have been asking a series of questions instead. What does the symbol on his chest mean? Did you lie to me? She should have explored the moment in more detail but she didn't, it just sort of happens that she changes her mind.

We also get this short moment with Lois Lane and Jimmy at the Daily Planet where they relive the same moment twice. It is unclear why the destruction of the sun would cause these characters to relive these moments, to be honest, and it would have been nice to see that explored further.

The Verdict

The bulk of this issue was mostly a fight between Diana and Kara, which is fine, but there should have been a bit more conversation and dialogue between the two characters where Diana would explain what exactly is going on and why helping H'el is a big no-no. At it's core, there were some interesting moments in this issue but in the end it did not make a whole lot of sense. It's difficult to determine exactly how Kara was able to come to her sense so quickly. The fight between she and Wonder Woman could have had a little bit more substance, too.

In the end this issue was not the best, but it was not so bad either. I think the writer depicted Kara very appropriately. It makes sense that she is uneasy and a little bit reckless in some scenes. The art in the issue was also very good and the layout of the panels (particularly the action scenes) were really well executed. This is not really the best place to pick up the story. If you have been following the 'H'el On Earth' story arc then you might enjoy it, but I personally felt this to be one of the series' weaker issues.

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#4 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

Brace yourself, this one's a tear jerker. One of the great things about this series is the consistency. When I think about the last 23 issues of DAREDEVIL I can honestly say that there has not been one issue I haven't enjoyed. This issue of DAREDEVIL is no different. Waid opens the issue by drawing a parallel between the events that led to Matt becoming Daredevil as a young boy, and to a science experiment that has recreated the toxin and driven people mad. The question remains, who is behind these experiments? It is obvious, based on this issue, that someone is targeting Daredevil by committing crimes that speak directly to him, and this has been the overarching theme throughout this series. Someone has it out for Matt, and it will be interesting to find out who.

Waid also balances the telling of a compelling overall story with a very personal one. This issue draws the focus away from crime-fighting and focuses instead on the foundation of the relationship between Matt and Foggy. What do these two characters mean to one another?

One of the things I enjoyed was seeing Foggy throw caution to the wind a bit and see the world from Matt's perspective for once. I think that this moment really digs deep into the relationship between these two characters and it also delves into what is currently happening in Foggy's life. The focus here is definitely on friendship, and for that reason this is a truly beautiful issue. It's also really great to see Waid let the artist, Chris Samnee, tell so much of the story particularly towards the end.

The Bad

Some of the pacing felt a tiny bit off, as though the comic felt a bit rushed towards the end. In the scene where we see Foggy looking at the clock waiting for Matt there could have been a little bit more suspense in that scene. Will Matt make it or will he let Foggy down again? It may have been the layout of the sequence of panels in that scene that I think could have been better executed.

The Verdict

Overall, this is another really wonderful issue of DAREDEVIL and one that will leave you feeling a little bit sad, particularly if you are heavily invested in these characters. This issue features some great dialogue and equally great art from Chris Samnee. I love that Mark Waid uses silence in scenes where it counts, allowing the artist to tell the story for him. There were some parts that felt a bit rushed, but overall this was a great issue.

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#5 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

The sixth issue of AVENGERS by Jonathan Hickman and Adam Kubert is interesting. Readers are given a recap of the most recent events, something that makes this issue very accessible to new readers who may not be caught up on the story in general. The issue opens with a completely black panel and the recounting of the 'big bang:' the birth of the universe. It's an incredibly dramatic sequence of panels leading up to a moment of meditation shared between two characters. The scene is very pretty, and speaks to this higher level of thought that all things in the universe have "some bits of celestial uniformity." There is a reason why Hickman titled this issue 'Zen And The Art Of Cosmology,' and it becomes very obvious very quickly as to why. What we get is a rather interesting conversation between a Man and a God. The dialogue from the very start of this issue is fantastic and really compelling: it pulls you right into the story in a really eloquent way.

Just as the last two issues focused on Smasher and Hyperion, respectively, this issue zeroes in on Shang-Chi. What are his abilities? What strengths and advantages will he bring to the Avengers team? Through Shang-Chi's dialogue and actions we discover more about the Universe's "Mother," a figure that appeared briefly in the third issue of this series. It is because of her that the three Gods we met on Mars let the Avengers go. The question remains, though, who is she? With Shang-Chi's help, the figure begins to recount her earliest memory and attempts to recall who she used to be.

These are not the only two characters we see in this issue, either. This is not the first time that Hickman has written Spider-Man. In fact, some of the most sentimental moments in FANTASTIC FOUR and FF featured the character. This is, however, one of the first times that Hickman has written this new Spider-Man (Doctor Octopus) and it's fun to see the blatant differences between the two characters and the way they are written.

I think beyond the fact that we get beautiful dialogue and stunning art in this issue, we also get a peek at Hickman's "bigger picture." In the third issue of this series we saw this being mentioned that the Earth bears some sort of importance and it is the reason why it cannot be destroyed. Hickman delves into this idea and explains why and what role the earth plays in regards to the bigger picture. Hickman draws a parallel between the universe and the host body in an interesting way.

The Bad

Nothing bad here, another brilliant issue in this incredibly compelling story.

The Verdict

Although the first three issues of this series felt like they were self contained and had a definitive beginning and an end, it is clear that Hickman has a bigger picture that he is playing with, and we see a glimpse of that here/ The being that the Avengers are introduced to at the start of this series plays an important role not only in this issue, but in this story in general. It's great to see Hickman circle back to a concept we saw previously, something I think that is essential to the story he is trying to tell. The dialogue is fantastic: it sets up the story in a compelling way and it clues us into the direction that Hickman plans on taking this series. Not only do we get a great story, but we have equally gorgeous art, too. Hickman manages to teeter between executing a story that is compelling and complex while still accessible to new readers.

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#6 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

Guys and ladies,

I want to thank you for reading the article I wrote yesterday and providing us with your personal perspectives on the subject! I think it's healthy to disagree and debate in a way that is respectful, and I was surprised to see that 90% of the comments focused on the context of the story and what the Joker's death means to Batman. Again, thanks for all the comments, most of these have stayed on topic and were really great. :)

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#7 Edited by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The following are Dynamite Entertainment's previews for the week of February 20th, 2013. Check them out below and let us know whether you plan on picking up any of these issues. Don't forget to also check out our exclusive, extended previews for both THE SPIDER #9 and SHERLOCK HOLMES: THE LIVERPOOL DEMON #2, here.

THE SHADOW: YEAR ONE #1 (of 8)

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FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen +

Written by Matt Wagner

Art by Wilfredo Torres

Cover by Alex Ross, Matt Wagner, Howard Chaykin, Chris Samnee

FANS, ASK YOUR RETAILER FOR THE
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Brennan Wagner Hand-Drawn Original Piece Of Art retailer incentive cover
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Wilfredo Torres Subscription Variant Exclusive cover
Shadow: Year One #1 Blank Authentix Cover
THE SHADOW is a character that has lasted through decades on the pages of pulp magazines, over the radio airwaves, thru the silver screen, and in the panels of comic books. Shrouded in mystery, his origins have been explored and hinted at over the years…but never fully revealed. Much is known of Kent Allard/Lamont Cranston’s years spent in the Orient and Central America—wherein he gains his powers and purpose…but not how he first developed his persona as the Master of Darkness. Eisner Award-winning author, Matt Wagner is joined by artist Wilfredo Torres in an exhilarating limited series that will explore the dynamic events that first drew Cranston back to the States, how he first met his companion and lover, Margo Lane, how he began to assemble his vast network of agents and how he first adopted the famous black hat and cloak as his alter-ego's disguise—all secrets that, up until now…only The Shadow knew
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DEJAH THORIS AND THE GREEN MEN OF MARS #1 (of 4)

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FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Mature

Written by Mark Rahner

Art by Lui Antonio

Cover by Jay Anacleto

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The princess of Helium is kidnapped and taken to the underground cave hideaway of the brutal rogue Thark, Voro, who threatens to destroy the recent peace between the red-skinned Heliumites and the green-skinned Tharks. But Voro doesn’t want a ransom. He’s a butcher. For Tharks who never lost their taste for red meat, common Helium women are always in demand, but the incomparable Dejah Thoris will be the rarest of delicacies.
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THE BIONIC WOMAN #8

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32 pages FC • $3.99 • Teen +

Written by Paul Tobin

Art by Juan Antonio Ramirez

Cover by Mike Mayhew

Is that a 90mm Matador rocket launcher, or are you just happy to see me? Jaime's search into the remnants of her past lead her to discover a high-school friend who has gone on to become an international weapons dealer, and a high-ranking member of the Russian "Bratva" mob's "most wanted... dead" list! Can Jaime save her friend's life? And... should she? And what part do the fembots play? It's violence in Volgograd, when the Bionic Woman comes to town!

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LORD OF THE JUNGLE #13

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32 pages FC • $3.99 • Mature

Written by Arvid Nelson

Art by Roberto Castro

Cover by Lucio Parrillo

The savage ape-man clashes with Russian super-fiend Nicholas Rokoff in the shadow of the legendary city of Opar. Don't worry! It's only the fate of the free world hanging in the balance. Rokoff is holding the ape-man's true love hostage, and he won't hesitate to kill her. But wait – the savage denizens of Opar are out for vengeance following the ape-man's escape from their clutches, and they could ruin everyone's plans. Lord of the Jungle #13: Through the Valley of the Shadow!
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#8 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

Fixed! Sorry, guys! The covers in the wiki hadn't credited the artists! My apologies.

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#9 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

Writer Ed Brubaker continues this trend in FATALE where he delves deeper into the history of this magic and mysticism, and further and further away from the femme fatale (Josephine) at the center of this story. This time, Brubaker takes us to France, 1286 A.D. to a time where "witches" were burned at the stake. This time we follow a woman named Mathilda who suffers the same ailments that Josefine does: a woman who, as years pass her by, never ages a single day and wherever she walks, tragedy surely follows. Here, however, we get a closer look a the mystical power that this woman possesses. Even after being burned at the stake by a group called "The White Brotherhood," she manages to survive. Does this mean that Mathilda is immortal, and what does that mean for Josephine? I really like the way that Brubaker gives us a parallel story. He steps away from Josephine and the main story and turns instead to a tale of a woman who is remarkably similar to her. This is a great way to provide readers with insight into what it is exactly that is forcing this character to act in this way. It gives readers a chance to indirectly discover the extent of Josephine's powers, and it is all very well done.

Beyond getting insight into the extent of Josephine's capabilities, we also get a look at the reason behind the things that have been happening to her. Why is this strange cult been after her? What did they want? It is interesting to see the way things develop and Brubaker provides us with a lot of answers in this issue to what's going on in the main story without giving too much of it away.

Artist Sean Phillips once again illustrates another flawless issue of FATALE, adding depth and beauty to an already captivating story. He is the perfect artist for this book, capturing the tone of the story Brubaker is trying to tell in a way that is simply lovely.

The Bad

Nothing bad to say about this issue, this is yet another beautiful issue of FATALE.

The Verdict

At first, I wondered whether the connection between Mathilda and Josephine was more than just the fact that these two women lived seemingly parallel lives: I wondered whether they were one and the same. The answer to that comes at the very end. This final scene also explains a lot of what has been going on. Why are these men after Josefine? What do they want with her? Drawing a parallel between these two seemingly similar characters is a great way of expanding the story and digging deeper into a set of characters in a way that isn't quite so obvious.

The issue is incredibly well organized. Every scene serves a purpose, but the story is a bit sad. It is upsetting that Mathilda had finally found someone who did not desire her in a sexual way; that she had finally found some peace only to see it all come to a violent end. It does force readers to beg the question, will Josephine fall prey to the same fate? Or will she manage to break the cycle? This is a good self-contained, jumping on point. As a stand alone story it's really well written and well done, but it also serves a far greater purpose in the grand scheme of things.

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#10 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

I am such a big fan of Bernard Chang's art on this series. He is one of the more consistent artists working in comics; never sacrificing detail in his panels, and he proves that he is incredibly skilled in this issue. Beyond the fact that the anatomy of the characters is simply perfect, he also does a wonderful job capturing the mystical tone of the book. He is really a perfect fit and does some very impressive work here.

Some of the concepts introduced by writer Robert Venditti in the last issue of this series are brought up again towards the end of the comic. Some of the ideas from the beginning of issue #16 resurface and are brought to light in a way that is interesting.

There is definitely a lot of talking and character development in this issue, and I actually really enjoyed that. I like the fact that Venditti can not only write an actual action scene, but he is also able to execute a verbal debate in an interesting way. The scene between Vandal Savage and Exoristos in particular is especially fun.

The issue ends on a cliff hanger, leaving readers wondering is Jason and Etrigan will actually reunite, or whether the two will remain apart. Vandal's role in this series is interesting and the ending will definitely leave you wondering what the greater role and purpose of these new characters will be to the overall story.

The Bad

Nothing bad here. This issue is a lot of fun.

The Verdict

I really enjoyed the way this issue is structured. It opens with Etrigan, moves forward and delves into other characters before non chalantly bringing the relationship between Jason and Etrigan back into focus once again. I think the fact that Venditti did this so discretely is what made the story more fun to read. The layout was great and very organized: reading this I could tell exactly where Venditti's beats are . He definitely had some things he wanted to accomplish in this issue and he did so, but not without leaving some loose ends and cliff hangers for fans of this series to look forward to in the coming issues. The issue is very well written, Venditti gets these characters and knows their respective voices and he is clearly weaving a story that is engaging and fun for both old and new readers alike. This is also a great jumping on point for anyone interested in diving in.