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#1 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

Jason Blood makes his triumphant return, and he does so with a little help from his friends: one in particular. Yet the friends he keeps underestimate him and his abilities, and Jason doesn't appreciate that one bit. In this issue, Jason is the central character: his recent experiences, torment and pain have molded him into a different man. He knows this, and while his friends may not, he will insist on making sure that he gets a bit of his own brand of revenge on a certain demon. The dynamic here between Etrigan and Jason Blood is interesting: even though the two characters never spend time together on panel, their rivalry and resentment for one another is being molded into an incredibly interesting relationship. The two characters clearly despise one another and writer Robert Venditti really gets that.

Bernard Chang delivers yet another beautifully penciled issue, and the colors are vibrant and bright; really perfectly done and very complimentary to the story in this comic.

Venditti is able to bring a lot of very different characters alive on the pages of this series, and he successfully gives each of them time to interact with one another and shine in their own right in this current story. The result is a dynamic story that is well told, a plot that is organized and well executed, and a story that is interesting and very different from so many of the other titles currently being published at DC. These characters are complex and interesting, and Venditti has a fantastic way of telling pieces of a story without unveiling all the cards under his sleeve. He is great at giving us depth with few words, choosing the language carefully.

The Bad

There is really nothing bad in this issue. This is a great follow up to an already very interesting story.

The Verdict

I really have been enjoying this series and I think Venditti has done a fantastic job taking on these interesting characters and playing with their relationships a little bit. This has been an incredibly exciting issue, and the story that we get here is definitely one that continues to escalate and get more and more interesting. The art is really fantastic, and very complimentary to the story being told here, which is great. The result is another solid issue and one that is bound to pique the interest of anyone fascinated by and invested in the world of Etrigan and his supporting cast. As far as a jumping on point, you can definitely start your journey here as it is, for the most part, easy to follow along. You may, however, not get the most out of the story if you don't at the very least read the previous issue.

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#2 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

The issue opens with a quick recap of what happened in the last issue if you missed the launch of this series. Bunn very cleverly gives readers a recap of what happened in issue #1 before jumping right into the current story and introducing a new character to the series. As a fan of Dani Moonstar -- the leader of the New Mutants who is "no longer a mutant herself -- it was great not only to see her in this series, but to see her kicking major butt within the issue's first few pages.

We are more formally introduced to the villain in this story when we meet Caroline Le Fay, who has successfully managed to make Dani her slave for the time being. We are introduced to the character as well as her motives. The story shifts quickly away from these two to the three ladies we met in the first issue: Misty Knight, Valkyrie, and Dr. Annabelle Riggs. The ladies are in Asgardia for some very important business, but Misty makes a point to state that she sometimes needs down time -- something that makes sense since she is, after all, only human.

There are a great series of panels that delve into Valkyrie's purpose in being on Midgard in the first place and it explores what the character had been up to for a long time before meeting Misty Knight and forming the "Fearless Defenders."

The Bad

There were moments (particularly in the beginning of the issue where Dani is mid-fight) where the character appears very static, almost as if her body wasn't moving with her head during the fight. The expression was the same throughout and although pretty, the art was not fluid and I think that really took away from the story in that moment. The art was consistent in that way throughout the issue; while it wasn't bad, it certainly was not the best portrayal of action that we've seen.

There are some moments where I felt the issue was disorganized and it was difficult to understand exactly what was going on, particularly toward the end. One minute the team is on Asgardia receiving what seems to be some kind of a lecture, and the next they are confronted by Hela. It's a scene that just sprouts out of the blue and it doesn't feel very cohesive.

The Verdict

Overall, this issue was not as solid as the first one. There were moments where the story felt slightly confusing and characters were just abruptly introduced into the story in a way that didn't really make sense. They were introduced quickly (towards the end) and the scenes that followed simply did not feel natural.

I enjoyed seeing the introduction of two new characters to the story, I thought that was great and that for the most part they were introduced in a way that made sense. I particularly liked the way Dani was written at the start of the series, although I would have liked to see that fleshed out a bit more.

There were definitely some inconsistencies in the art of this issue. There were moments where the action scenes were not fluid and very static, and the characters just seemed to be anatomically incorrect in the way that they were drawn.

Overall, this issue was definitely a step down from the previous issue, although I will say I do like the way that Valkyrie is portrayed here: I think Cullen Bunn has a real grasp and vision for the character and the story he wants to tell so it will be interesting to see how he develops her character further.

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#3 Edited by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The following are the Dynamite Entertainment new releases previews for the week of March 13th, 2013. For the exclusive, extended previews of Dynamite Entertainment's new releases for this week including THUNDERBOLT #7, WHEEL OF TIME #31 & GHOUL GOBLIN #3, check out the link here.

GEORGE R.R. MARTIN’S A GAME OF THRONES #13

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32 pages FC • $3.99 • Mature

Written by George R.R. Martin

Adapted by Daniel Abraham

Art by Tommy Patterson

Covers by Mike S. Miller (50%), Michael Komarck (50%)

In the aftermath of Jaime Lannister’s brutal attack upon Eddard Stark and his men, King Robert meets with the wounded Eddard—and presents him with a choice of evils: either Eddard accepts the heavy mantle of the King’s Hand once more . . . or Robert will appoint Jaime to the position. Adding to the troubles of House Stark, Tyrion Lannister wins his freedom from Catelyn Stark; now the Imp will return to his father, intent on revenge for his treatment at the hands of Cat and her mad sister. Meanwhile, far to the north, the bastard Jon Snow becomes a sworn brother of the Night’s Watch and must put his loyalty to the Starks aside.
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THE SHADOW #10

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32 pages FC • $3.99 • Teen +

Written by Victor Gischler

Art by Aaron Campbell

Covers by Alex Ross (25%), Tim Bradstreet (25%), Francesco Francavilla (25%), Jack Herbert (25%)

Fans, ask your retailer for these variant incentive covers!

• Ross “virgin art” retailer incentive cover

• Ross “sketch art” retailer incentive cover

Revolutionary Part 3 (of 4) - The Shadow, along with faithful sidekick and pilot Miles Crofton and new partner in adventure George Orwell, pursues The Black Sparrow across the war-torn Spanish countryside. Cranston must decide how he’s going to confront the woman who is both former lover and current adversary, but there is a new player in the mix! Just who is the maniacal El Rey? The Shadow must thwart El Rey’s plot to rise from the debris of a war shattered nation and install himself as supreme ruler.
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THE BIONIC MAN ANNUAL #1

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FC • 40 pages • $4.99 • Teen +

Written by Scott Beatty

Art by Dietrich Smith

Cover by Mike Mayhew

Three words: Venus Death Probe. When a clandestine Chinese spacecraft crash lands north of Alaska, its a race against time between China and the United States--each anxious to salvage valuable high-tech secrets--to hunt down an errant rover built to survive the greenhouse hell of the Venusian atmosphere! OSI Agent Steve Austin tests the limits of his bionics as he hunts down an independent-minded machine determined to complete its mission no matter where it has landed!
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DEJAH THORIS AND THE GREEN MEN OF MARS #2 (of 4)

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FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Mature

Written by Mark Rahner

Art by Lui Antonio

Cover by Jay Anacleto

Things go from bad to dark, hopeless and stomach-churningly gruesome for the Princess of Helium. She’s been kidnapped by rogue Thark, Voro, a black marketeer for green men with a certain forbidden taste. When she’s locked in a dungeon with other doomed red-skinned women, Dejah Thoris is in for a fate that really is worse than just death. Voro’s keeping the women alive and performing one amputation after another on them. Nothing but the freshest red meat for his customers.
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JENNIFER BLOOD VOL. 3: NEITHER TARNISHED NOR AFRAID TP

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FC • 152 pages • $19.99 • Mature

Written by Al Ewing

Art by Kewber Baal & Eman Casallos

Cover by Tim Bradstreet

It looks like Jen’s finally got everything she wants - her crusade against her murderous Uncles is over and done with and she’s successfully fended off attacks by everyone from war profiteers to waffle salesmen. There’s just one tiny fly in the ointment: Detective Elaine Pruitt, Homicide. Jennifer Blood killed her partner, but didn’t quite manage to kill her. That was a mistake. Meanwhile, an old flame of Andy’s re-enters his life. For anyone else’s family, it’d be the makings of a fairly standard suburban drama. But this is Jennifer Blood’s family. And she’ll do anything she thinks she has to to preserve it.
This volume collects issues 13-18 by Al Ewing, Kewber Baal and Eman Casallos, and includes all of the covers by Tim Bradstreet and more.
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#4 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

Joe Harris and Martin Morazzo continue to deliver an interesting book that is definitely dealing with some very interesting concepts. This series deals with issues that we haven't really seen in comics before and that's what makes it so interesting: we get real life problems intertwined with a rather fascinating fictional story. The comic turns out to be well written, organized clearly and overall just really, really pretty.

There are two stories being told in this issue simultaneously. First we have Chaz Worthington who has been captured by a group of pirates on the island he has claimed is his. It is interesting to see how in only five issues Worthington has seemingly evolved into a character that was naive about the way the world works, to a young man who is completely taken by surprise and becomes considerably less entitled. And although Chas recognizes that he isn't the only one invested in this pile of trash that is this island, he is still incredibly ambitious (and maybe a little bit crazy) and refuses to give in to his captors. I think the way the creative team is developing the central character is rather interesting. Sure he's a rich kid who's been fed with a silver spoon most of his life, but he is also really rather resourceful, and that's something we see here very clearly early on. As the story progresses it gets interesting and it's great to see the train of thought in Zoe's mind: I think this is particularly well reflected in Morazzo's art, and really beautifully illustrated. The pace of the issue picks up about halfway through and things start to really heat up and become very interesting.

Chas' story gets even more and more complicated as the issue progresses, and readers begin to see that there are more than just two groups invested in this island: that you can't just waltz onto a piece of land (in this case, a garbage heap) and claim it for your own. Even garbage heaps mean something to somebody.

We have both Chas' story and his sort of journey into adulthood, realizing that he was very naive and his behavior has a lot of consequences, as well as the story of his best friend. There are at least four external factors influencing what will ultimately happen to Chaz and his island, and they definitely become clearer through this issue.

The Bad

This is by far one of the most exciting issues of this series thus far: no complaints.

The Verdict

It's funny how nothing actually happens in this issue (in terms of action) and yet, so much happens here. There is not only a lot of character development, but also an interesting introduction to a variety of different characters and groups who are all equally invested in the same thing: New Texas (or at least what's on it). What we get is an interesting story and an issue that pushes the plot really far, ending on a serious cliff hanger that will leave readers yearning for more. The great story is paired with some very beautiful (and very telling) art by Martin Morazzo making this issue one you will definitely want to pick up. So far, one of the best issues in this series, hands down. Finally, while I don't recommend starting here, this is an easy place to pick up the story and follow along.

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#5 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

What incredible art this book has. So detailed, the panels so abstract, the colors make the reading experience as a whole absolutely breathtaking. Reading this issue is a process, you have to take it in sort of slowly not only because there is so much that happens, but also because each panel is more beautiful than the next. If you are anything like me, this issue will leave you completely in awe. Beyond the fact that it is incredibly detailed, it is the colors that really make this issue pop. The way that light is used to accentuate reflections on the faces of certain characters in certain key moments will just leave you in awe.The art in this comic is absolutely breathtaking, and completely complimentary to the dialogue and the story that we read in this issue.

A lot of what happens in this issue is really big; and when I say big, I mean that Hickman is continuing to dish out a story on a huge, intergalactic scale. While it is big in scope, the story is still easy to understand in the sense that it is well organized, structured and overall really well written.

This issue deals with a major event (The White Event) on a huge scale, and one constant message is continually reiterated: the machine is broken. The machine being referenced here is the machine that is responsible for selecting the Starbrand: a person with enough power to protect the entire planet. Because the machine is "broken," the Starbrand selection process is altered and imperfect. There is room for flaw. So what happens when there is a chance that ultimate cosmic power gets into the wrong hands? Well, that's a big problem, isn't it?

Hickman ends the issue on a cliff hanger, and what he does in the final pages of this issue may make you go back and look through the issue from the beginning. It is incredibly well executed the last few pages of this comic, particularly in terms of what the creative team does with the colors in these final panels. Overall, it's just really well done and the story ends on a real high: readers will be left curious and excited to read the upcoming issue.

The Bad

There is really nothing bad to say about this issue. One of the best issues thus far, really pushes the story and sets readers up for what will likely be one heck of a ride.

The Verdict

I may be biased: I seem to love everything Hickman does, but he just knocks it out of the park with this issue. Not only is this a beautifully illustrated and colored comic book, but the set up, structure, concept and dialogue are absolutely phenomenal. Everything about this comic is incredible. The way he gradually sets up the story and introduces this huge idea, luring the reader in gradually and casually rather than all at once; it's perfect. There is so much about this comic that is really fantastic and the way it ends is just mind blowing. It ends on this tremendous high that just really captivates you and lures you in. It's fantastic stuff. Overall, excellent issue that is not only a lot of fun to read, but clearly the start of something really cool.

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#6 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

The last we saw the Wonders they had been transported to a mystical place and confronted by a man with green skin. We don't start exactly with that moment, but instead we see Khalid and his first encounter with Nabu's helmet -- the helmet that would turn him into Doctor Fate. The moment passes quickly and we are once again introduced to the green man we saw at the end of the previous issue, Karel Wotan.

I really like the way the dialogue is structured around the idea of Fate. Wotan's play on words in this scene is fantastic and sets up a great series of moments that follow. This moment is later followed by a beautiful page illustrated by Nicola Scott from the perspective of the ground up. It's an incredibly intricate image that is beautifully drawn. There is a ton going on in this panel and it is very well executed.

Early on in this series and in one of my early reviews I mentioned the importance of honoring character deaths. I think that in order to really create an impact, the death of the character should not be something that begins and ends in that moment; it is something that needs to be expanded upon. When Sam was first killed in this series, I mentioned I hoped Robinson would allow Alan Scott to grieve and mourn, and this is something that we are seeing here. Robinson isn't solely using the character death as a plot device, he is also exploring the character even after his death and I really think this is important: it gives value to the character, his death, and creates an interesting dynamic in his relationship with Alan Scott.

Not only are we introduced to some new characters in this issue (Khalid, for example), we also begin to see Alan Scott's character evolve a little bit. There is a great scene where he sort of eats his words a little bit, and if you have been following the series then you will be pleased to see that here.

The Bad

The issue is really wordy, very heavy on the dialogue. Robinson does this often and usually it's alright, but I think there were points in the issue that could have been better organized. There are some panels that I felt should have been expanded on, like the moment where Khalid is talking about the tower, for example. I think that this particular scene could have been fleshed out a bit and the writer could have utilized the artist to really draw it out, extending one panel into say two or three at least. It's a very well articulated piece of dialogue that could have been complimented with visuals.

As much as I like the pencils in this series, I have a bit of trouble with the colors. There are some moments where I think their brightness and vibrance almost overshadow Nicola Scott's talents as a penciler and take away from the art in the comic. I think it makes it a bit more. I wouldn't seeing more shadows, particularly in this issue where there was a big focus on architectural structures.

The Verdict

Overall I liked this issue a lot. I don't necessarily recommend this issue as a starting point for anyone who has yet to read the series, but I do believe it is a great issue overall. I think it presents a very interesting story and introduces us to new characters while expanding on things we have already seen in previous issues. The layout is really great and very organized, and Nicola Scott's pencils are incredibly detailed and very beautiful. There are some moments I felt could have been fleshed out a bit and some word balloons that could have been broken up and had more additional images to compliment them, but overall this was still a great issue.

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#7 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

This is a series that continues to be consistent. Each issue is poetic and really, really beautiful. It's gorgeously illustrated by Mike Mignola. The colors by artist Dave Stewart are completely complimentary to Mignola's artistic style and fall in line with the story he is trying to tell. Stewart's colors capture the dark, brooding moments we see in this issue in a gorgeous way. He uses colors to illustrate the change in mood and the direction the story is turning, setting the tone for Mignola's words that fall on the pages. This issue is, like its predecessors, minimalist in language and art, and it's done so brilliantly.

Last we saw Hellboy in Hell he had come to a stark realization of a heinous crime he had unintentionally committed. The final pages of the third issue capture the brevity of the situation in Hellboy's reaction to this awareness in a way that is really striking, and the fourth issue picks up where the third left off: Hellboy falling "into the abyss."

There is more dialogue in this issue than in previous issues, but even so it still isn't all that much. From the very start of this issue Hellboy comes full circle and is more formally introduced to the mysterious figure we saw in the first issue. Things are clearly very abstract (and have been) since the start of this series, but they become clearer here. Mignola draws an interesting parallel between Hellboy and the mysterious figure, Edward Grey, in an interesting way: connecting them with a piece of art that isn't very famous.

This issue serves as a lesson to Hellboy, teaching him that he does not need to remember everything he's done and every act he has committed, and that sometimes some doors are "better off locked, boarded up and bricked over." The issue shifts in focus from Hellboy and what he did in issue #3, to recounting the story of Edward Grey, his disappearance and how he became a guide to Hellboy in Hell. How sometimes being a "good guy" can still lead you to darkness even if you live a good life. Both characters are similar, being agents for organizations whose sole purpose is to solve mysteries "pertaining to the occult." The two characters have an incredible amount of things in common. Grey's story is an incredibly tragic one, and rather unfair but told in a very poignant and beautiful way. Mignola walks the line between dialogue that places readers in the thick of the moment, and pulls you out slowly as the story is narrated. It's also quite interesting to see Mignola reference classic works like John Milton's Paradise Lost (which, if you haven't read, you absolutely should) using it as a staple and outline for his story.

The Bad

Nothing bad here, another brilliant issue.

The Verdict

I would say this is a good jumping on point because it takes the focus away from Hellboy and focuses primarily of Edward Grey, his guide through Hell. It's written in a way that is accessible and easy to follow, although I would still recommend picking up the previous three issues of this series if you want a solid grasp on the story.

I love the parallels drawn between Edward Grey and Hellboy and it is so interesting to see Grey's story unfold. The way it is written, brings readers into the past really effortlessly, and is highlighted by moments where Grey's character narrates the story. It is incredibly well done and uses very little language to tell the story. It's a sad, poignant moment about a man who gives his life for a noble cause only to be punished by forces far greater than he. Once again, a gorgeous story combined with stunning illustration make this issue a must read for this week.

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#8 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The following are previews for Dynamite Entertainment titles in stores tomorrow, March 6th, 2013. For exclusive, extended previews of THE BIONIC MAN #17, DEJAH THORIS #23 and VAMPIRELLA #27, visit the link to our news page, here.

VAMPIRELLA STRIKES #3 (of 6)

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FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+

Written by Tom Sneigoski

Art by Johnny Desjardins

Cover by Johnny Desjardins, Fabiano Neves

FANS, ASK YOUR RETAILER FOR THE

Johnny Desjardins “blood red art” retailer incentive cover

Fabiano Neves black & white art retailer incentive cover

Exclusive Subscription Variant Photo Cover

The angel general, Evanuel has made a deal with devils—but why? What secret would be so dire as to make one of the most powerful angel soldiers in Heaven's legions give up his blood willingly?
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DARK SHADOWS #14

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32 pages FC • $3.99 • Teen +

Written by Mike Raicht

Art by Nacho Tenorio

Cover by Francesco Francavilla

The future of Collinwood has been glimpsed. Barnabas and his clan are headed towards dark days. What are those who endured it willing to sacrifice to make sure it never happens? Is it too late for some, or is there one last drastic measure one member of the clan can make to make the
future unknown again?
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VOLTRON: YEAR ONE VOL. 1 TP

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160 pages FC • $19.99 • Teen +

Written by Brandon Thomas

Art by Craig Cermak

Cover by Admira Wijaya

Before Arus. Before Voltron. They were Space Explorer Squadron #686.
Soon, they will be known as the legendary Voltron Force -- Keith, Lance, Hunk, Sven, and Pidge -- five young men entrusted with five powerful robot lions and the responsibility of defending the universe from unimaginable evil. Now, as one of the Space Explorers, under the command of the Galaxy Alliance, they are tasked with keeping the Earth safe and the skies clear in a universe growing more and more dangerous every day. They’re the best central command has to offer, and have never once failed a mission. Everything changes in a flash, and Commander Sven, already hammered by persistent feelings of self-doubt and inadequacy, finds himself in the middle of a conspiracy that reaches to the top of the Galaxy Alliance. All the while he continues to be plagued by nightmares, convinced that he’ll make a critical mistake that’ll lead to the horrible deaths of his friends. When the pressure on him intensifies, he pursues a number of increasingly desperate measures that just might bring these fears to terrible life. For years, Voltron fans all over the world have wondered -- why this specific team of space explorers? How did they receive the important mission to bring back Voltron? Were they sent because their superiors hoped they would succeed, or because they knew they would fail?
COLLECTION FEATURES:
• Issues the complete mini-series by Brandon Thomas and Craig Cermak
• All issue covers by Admira Wijaya and more
• Writer’s commentary for issues 1 and 2 by series writer Brandon Thomas
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#9 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

@michaelthemighty17 said:

sara will you skype for the podcast

Yes I did!

@HellknightLeon said:

Thanks GiantBomb for spilling the news about Sara early. :) I wish you the best out that way Babs and stay warm. Awesome video and can't wait to see what you can do with your office space.

Thank you very much! :)

@kcvic said:

east coast whats up with that? how'd you go thru the midwest and we didn't do lunch?

It's a travesty!

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#10 Posted by No_Name_ (16193 posts) - - Show Bio

The Good

The dialogue in this issue really struck me as spectacular. When we first open the comic we are greeted with a fantastic scene where Wonder Woman is debating how to tell Zola that her child could literally "bring about the end of time." The dynamic between the characters in this scene is amazing, from the expressions on their faces and the way they interact to the expressions on their faces. This isn't at all where that ends, however. In fact, it is just the beginning. This issue is chock full of incredible dynamic and character interactions that will have you laughing out loud. The story is just perfect, and Azzarello really uses this idea that the "enemy of my enemy is my friend" to his advantage in more than one way. These characters clearly do not want to work together, but sacrifices must be made. As a result, we get a highly entertaining comic with incredible dialogue and really interesting characters.

One particular interaction is revisited here which absolutely makes this issue worth picking up. If you read the "zero" issue of Wonder Woman you will remember we got a flash back to when Diana was a young girl. In it, we learn that she was not only trained to be a warrior at the hand of her mother and her sisters, but that she was also mentored by the God of War. There is a fantastic interaction between these two characters here where Diana engages in a discussion with War. It's really a great scene, but beyond that, it delves into the relationship between these two characters. Will she trust him? Will she be able to trust him? There are some big revelations in this issue and it might be what you have been waiting for.

The Bad

Nothing bad here. This issue is fantastic and will definitely be hard to put down.

The Verdict

Some issues of WONDER WOMAN are chock full of action and adventure. This one, however, focuses on intrigue and character development and pushes the story we have been seeing develop further than it's been pushed before. The result? Incredible character interaction and development and some great examples of how to write an interesting comic book story without beating everybody up. Beyond the fact that the creative team does a phenomenal job writing interesting and compelling character interactions, we also get to see them explored on a personal level. This issue will keep you at the edge of your seat wanting more, and will definitely leave you looking forward to Wonder Woman's next interaction with Orion. You know, because that dude is just the biggest jerk (and I kind of love it). Great art, amazing story, perfect pacing and a serious push forward in the direction of the story make this issue one you will not want to miss.