JKBart

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JKBart is dead.

Greetings.

On behalf of Bart, whose passwords I've got from them being saved via KeyPass on his personal computer, I am writing this message as I believe it to be a proper decision so the people he knew will be adequately informed, so there will be no disinformation spread around concerning his disappearance.

On the day of 3th July 2015, Bart committed suicide carried out via his personal gun Mauser, shooting himself in the head. His funeral was organized on 7th July. I am now taking care of his personal data on behalf of his family.

Best regards,

Qboolean1.

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Star Wars respect threads index

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I have decided to create an ordered index for all the SW respect threads. Basically, I don't feel like doing anything more creative than gathering links today, tbh.

There is already a general "Respect Thread Directory" thread somewhere there, but I'm not sure if it's updated regularly, and I think there are enough Star Wars threads that they deserve a more easy-to-navigate layout. I am going to use chronological order first, by the officially recognized publishing eras within the SW old canon. There are a few difficult things - some characters lived throughout all the eras, so I will put them in every time-category they lived in with at least one appearance, or are recognized as affiliated with that era (like Abeloth being strongly associated with ancient times, even despite lack of appearances). I think it is the only fair option, as debating which era is the most prominent for a specific character would take ages, and the listing is supposed to be as easy to navigate as possible.

I hope you'll find my brainless-time filler useful.

Without more fuss, here it goes.

Pre-Republic times ( - 25 000 BBY)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

Old Republic era (25 000 BBY - 1000 BBY)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

Rise of the Empire (1000 BBY - 0 ABY)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

Rebellion (0 ABY - 5 ABY)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

New Republic (5 ABY - 25 ABY)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

New Jedi Order (25 ABY - 37 ABY)

Lightsiders

Others

Legacy (37 ABY+)

Lightsiders

Darksiders

Others

40 Comments

Lightsaber forms myths

There are two reasons why I have decided to write this. The first one is the same as the idea of my entire presence on ComicVine - practicing my English in writing and polishing my skills in that. The second is that in the Star Wars threads around all the duel topics and entire CaVs, there are tons of actual misinterpretations repeated over and over - or at least that's how I view them. So, I shall go with them one by one.

Form I: Shii-Cho - being better against multiple blades

False.

There are tons of sources that depict Shii-Cho as wonderful against multiple opponents, obviously. Off the top of my head, without checking - Jedi vs. Sith, that Fightsaber article, KotOR II itself, one of its guides too I believe. It was also noted many times that it's weaker against single opponents, particularly in case of Kit Fisto.

There is a large difference between fighting multiple opponents, and one opponent with multiple weapons. No matter how many blades do you carry, their range is the same as the range of your limbs. Of course, the range is all in all higher when you wield a saberstaff or dual blades, as you can extend both your arms at the same time - you can cover larger range around yourself, although horizontally the range is still the same.

Shii-Cho is all about wide range of your strikes, covering large range around yourself, having your blade swinging around a large area. Those sweeping moves are obviously better against multiple opponents. Here's why: your movements aren't focused forward only, as they would be in most other disciplines. They are focused around you, so it's obviously way simpler to put your blade on the way of impending strikes from your flanks.

What does it have to do with fighting one opponent with multiple blades? Nothing. Your opponent is still in front of you, your moves would be best focused forward, as wider swings are a waste of space and time. You swing your blade too widely - you swing it to the area where there's no attack to intercept, no one to hit, no obstacle to deflect your blade from, and stuff. You move the blade pointlessly. Opponent's attacks aren't encircling you in any way, unless he has a weapon large enough (or properly insane reach of his libms) that it can go around you.

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This guy has no advantage here. His mobility and wide range of movements is useless, as his opponent is usually obviously in front of him.

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However, he had a decent advantage here.

I have never seen any source suggesting directly that multiple blades in hands of one opponent help a Shii-Cho fighter - and the idea of multiple opponents simply nowhere translates into that.

Form II: Makashi - perfect against Shii-Cho

True.

Makashi is obviously form based on fencing, on forward-inward movements, and that obviously comes with a great conflict with the ideas of circular range of Shii-Cho presented above. Shii-Cho was also specifically stated as a style designed in times, when there weren't lightsaber duels at all, while Makashi is dueling-centered, specialized style. The outcome is obvious. That "myth" is a simple, justified and obvious line of thought.

Form II: Makashi - weak against physical strength

Semi-true.

Makashi, designed for minimalism and economy focuses on redirecting the strength of opposing attacks through proper balance of movement (common in regular fencing arts), parries and ripostes, minimizing the physical impact through footwork and simple withdrawals, and stuff like that.

One-handed movements are important in this style, and such grip obviously lessens your own strength to keep up. That's an important point that definitely makes a weakness.

Other than that, the style doesn't do that much to hinder your strength. You discard your enemy's physical brawn through fencing methods presented above, but obviously they have their limit - and that can simply be overloaded. Stances and form of movement may or may not make you take more "pressure", when that overload happens. It is nowhere specifically explained, and in real swordfighting arts it can go in each of these directions. And of course, when the "overload" (to put it as simple as possible) happens, you are forced to take the pressure that would otherwise be less painful when you met the strike head-on. Your parry being broken is more damaging to your muscles than participating in regular contest of strength. In those ways, Makashi is definitely weaker if your opponent's strength highly exceeds yours. Nothing more - a relatively thin advantage isn't larger in any way because the weaker party fights in Form II manner. However, in large, clear gaps like between Dooku and Anakin - it is definitely a huge problem.

Form III: Soresu - weak against Makashi

Debatable.

Soresu is classical swordfighting, entirely focused on defensive fighting, while Djem So is the opposite, focused on offense. Makashi is different in that it has more to do with fencing than broadsword fighting, but with Makashi's prime attribute being precision, minimalism, and all the stuff important in breaking through one's defense with precision, it's definitely better suited than Djem So or Juyo. The scale is unknown, though.

Form IV: Ataru - weak against Makashi

Most probably.

Simply put, in real world it would be obvious why reserved style designed for fencing's precision is at an advantage against the style where movements are broader, and opponent moves more, allowing for more mistakes in the footwork, more openings from larger move of the body, and stuff.

Form IV: Ataru - weak against multiple opponents

True.

Ataru requires a lot of space for extensive, acrobatical movements, rotations, opened strikes. This is heavily denied to you when you're surrounded - you, simply put, have less space around you to manuever, especially when considering the opponents shall follow you, try to predict your movements, block them. You have two times less space, it is pretty obvious.

Ataru is stamina-draining, whereas your opponents can obviously divide the pressure put on you - it is also worth noting.

Form IV: Ataru - weak against multiple blades.

False.

As I wrote regarding Shii-Cho, there is a huge difference between fighting multiple opponents, and multiple weapons in hands of one opponent. The logic is the same - you fight against one person. No matter how many weapons he has, he is one person, there aren't two bodies around you blocking your movements, two opponents fighting one after another while you drain your stamina continuously. Nothing in Ataru's technical characteristics suggests the style should be at a disadvantage against multiple blades. Acrobatics have nothing to do, focus on speed isn't a problem, although against multiple blades focus on strength would be better, stamina-draining is the same problem everywhere unless there are more opponents.

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This guy wasn't at any sort of disadvantage because Grievous had three blades. He was at a disadvantage after fighting in a grand, totally lost battle and retreating though.

Form VI: Niman - the weakest lightsaber style

Somewhat. Depends.

Niman is well-rounded, general, simplified style gathering all the elements of the other styles. As such, it suffers no extensive drawbacks, but lacks any specific attribute, any focus. In Djem So, your physical strength and systematic offense is your main feat, it is your main tool for the battle, your primary way. With proper tactics, adjustments, combative awareness and adaptability - this one tool can be used as a key for victory against anything. It can be used to properly, gradually destroy Soresu fighter (Sarro Xaj vs. Darth Zannah), it can be used as a means of counter-attack against heavy blaster fire from one source (being capable of putting up direct resistance), gradual counter-attacks to a larger fire (Anakin vs. tons of droids), to supress Makashi duelist, to fight moving forward against Shii-Cho practitioner, and stuff. I am giving Djem So as the main example, but it applies to the rest. Fighting in dedication to impenetrable defense of Soresu, precision, economy, prolonged tactical plans, a fencing game of chess - all of those can be altered and applied properly to different situations.

Niman provides no such tool, no specific way. With a proper skill - depending on who are you facing of course - you can apply that as described. But when you lack that own, mastered attribute, you don't have your own methods. With other styles, you can rely on properly applied offensive tactics to close the gaps you have in the defense, you can't use the perfect defense to cover up for your minimalistic movements, etc, etc. You specialize in something, put something ahead of the rest, and those parts carry your skill higher. It is obviously faster to become absolute master of Djem So's offense to make up for different potential hindrances in your style and in your own skill, than to become absolute master of everything at once. And when you fight someone else - your best skills stack up to the contest, what you can bring as the highest card and use it to play through the whole match.

That being said, Niman has the same potential as any other style - but requires obviously more work.

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