Cerberus

Cerberus
Cerberus
One of the most famous Greek monsters, Cerberus is one of the many monstrous sons of Typhon and Echidna, and serves Hades as the "Watching of Hell". He is sometimes Described as having a horde of serpents instead of a tail, more serpents for his mane, and fierce claws like a lion's. As Hades's watchdog, his duty was both to prevent the living from entering and the dead from leaving. Sometimes he was said to be so fierce that the dead would have to bribe him with a honey-cake in order to pass by. With his three heads, it was said that he never fully slept, and so trying to slip past him was a truly heroic task. Orpheus managed it, by using a lullaby to put Cerberus to sleep, and other legends mention Heroes finding a ways of drugging or stupefying him. The main legend where Cerberus appears as more than an identifying feature of hades is the story of the twelfth labor of Hercules. The king Eurystheus ordered Hercules to descend into the underworld and return Cerberus as his captive. Wisely, Hercules did not attempt to to seize the dog by violence. Instead he underwent purifying rituals, and enlisted hermes's aid so that he could visit Hades peacefully. Once there, he met with hades and Persephone, and politely asked if he could borrow Cerberus. Hades agreed on one condition that Hercules not actually hurt Cerberus in any way. So, with his bare hands, Hercules wrestled with Cerberus until he had the advantage over him, and then began dragging him up into the sunlight. Cerberus was accustomed to the Darkness of the underworld, and panicked furiously once in the upper world. saliva that fell from his three heads poisoned the ground, and caused the first deadly plant, Aconite(or wolfs bane) to grow. Upon seeing Cerberus, Eurystheus was so terrified that he immediately ordered Hercules to return the hound to Hades.                     
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