Binaryan

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Binaryan

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#1  Edited By Binaryan

I genuinely loved the books and movie....

I f I were to live on Mars, I'd use their advanced technology and wisdom to wipe the memories of all Earthlings of modern sci-fi influences... Spielberg, Lucas, Cameron, Ridley Scott, Roddenberry, Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Siegel & Schuster ---

so that they could rewatch JOHN CARTER and realize just how genius and creative and original Burrough's vision and contributions to the sci-fi genre were. The movie would be soooo successful that the books would be re-read by a new generation... more films would follow. And credit would be given to those who deserve it for opening our imaginations and spawning a genre that has given all of us endless hours of enjoyment.

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Binaryan

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#2  Edited By Binaryan

Just because Pixar is involved does not mean it will be animated.  Pixar is branching out into live-action properties (and adapted properties) and are already underway with the filming of  JOHN CARTER OF MARS starring Taylor Kitsch (Gambit), Lynn Collins (Silver Fox) and Willem Dafoe (Green Goblin).  Sounds like Marvel and Pixar have already collided given that casting.
 
I'd trust the Pixar geniuses with ANY Marvel property, though I would think a title like FANTASTIC FOUR, RUNAWAYS or POWER PACK would be more up their alley.
 
As for casting, I think Johnny Depp would be perfect given his acting pedigree.  If they wanted to go a bit younger, how about Orlando Bloom, Zachary Quinto or maybe Wes Bentley?

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Binaryan

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#3  Edited By Binaryan

 I lovelovelove Aronofsky.  THE FOUNTAIN is one of my favorite films.  That said, I'd only want him to direct this movie if he had a hand in shaping the script and the studio got out of his way and let him make an incredible movie.  He could do for WOLVERINE what Chris Nolan did for BATMAN.
 
My advice:  Keep it simple.  Japan.  Mariko. Shingen.  The Hand.  Yukio.  Silver Samurai.
 
Don't try and cram the movie with senseless cameos.  Keep it tight, coherent and self-contained.  Don't  even worry about tying it in to the past movies just don't outright contradict them.  And get the casting perfect.  

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Binaryan

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#4  Edited By Binaryan
Betty White as Blind Al.
 
Make it so!  She's a hotter celeb than Ryan Reynolds and his wife combined these days!
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Binaryan

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#5  Edited By Binaryan

Surprisingly, I've really enjoyed this series.   The latest volume of BLACK PANTHER and the use of Shuri as a female Panther didn't always sit right with me.  The espionage/high-tech angle was fun but often felt forced or over the top.  But this series has made that all worthwhile in my opinion.  The artwork alone is worth the price of admission (even with some unnecessarily murky inks and colors in places)  and is leaps and bounds over the stuff being offered up in several flagship titles (*coffLandcoff*).
 
As the cover with Doom playing chess implies, this is not just a straight-forward attack on his part.  He has been playing a deadly game of political cat and mouse with Wakanda and its Royal Family for some time and this is the end game.  Storm came across as a "damsel in distress" because Doom has maneuvered her into a position where her hands are tied by the circumstances he has very carefully orchestrated.  This is true of all of the key cast members, not just Ororo.   It's not that she's a wimp... but she has been rendered "helpless" in this situation.  He has discredited her publicly in front of the Wakandans and placed her in circumstances where she cannot readily cut loose and exercise her powers or martial prowess to their fullest.  She is confined by her duties as Queen, her love for T'Challa and the Wakandan people  and the fact that if she acts against Doom or the Desturi, she will irrevocably harm T'Challa's rule or trigger the death of his family.  Storm is seething and defiant and you can tell from the art that she is tortured by the situation she is in.  In fact, her barely restrained responses to Doom and her threats to trounce his tin-canned butt once she is able to do so is much more regal and bad-ass than she has been in years, IMHO.  T'Challa's characterization is a similar set-up by Doom.  Doom has taken him apart physically, stripped him of the diplomatic shield T'Challa always used in their past encounters and turned his own nation against him using deceit, fear-mongering and Wakanda's own xenophobic history against him.  T'Challa has had to reinvent himself as a hero and leader as a result and is still a broken and compromised hero in many regards as he takes on this challenge.  To me, this is great storytelling.  It captures why Doom is the biggest threat in the Marvel Universe.  It also sets up great tension in Ororo's married life.  So much so, that even if Doom doesn't manage to retain control of Wakanda or the Vibranium he's after, he's still dealt a significant blow to T'Challa and Ororo on a personal level.  One that they may never recover from.   Classic Doom and thoughtful character-building stuff for all involved.
 
It's complicated story-telling and an action-packed, tense pay-off to the sometimes painfully slow build-up in BLACK PANTHER for the last year.  Is it perfect?  No.  There are times it feels a bit drawn out and others where I'd like Maberry to linger a bit more.  The spiritual device of Bast is a bit... surreal.  But again, this illustrates Doom's cajones and character perfectly using the tools of Wakanda's mythology and T'Challa's own belief system to unseat him politically.   It's a brilliant stratagem on Doom's part and shows that he is a cunning and ruthless foe.  Unlike many depictions where he is relying on technology or direct attacks that are easily outsmarted because they are fueled by ego or rage, here he has used guile, political cunning, patience, technology and the personal emotional vulnerabilities of his foes to the fullest to set up a MAJOR coup of unprecedented proportions (thanks to the consistent build-up of Wakanda as unconquerable and T'Challa as a formidable, indomitable foe).  This series proves Doom's mettle and implacable nature and sets the other characters for major advancement in their own standing when they inevitably take him down.

That said, I'd much rather be reading this ambitious but somewhat flawed story-telling over most of Marvel's recent event stories where there's tons of build-up, a bit of shock and awe (oh no Ares is torn in half - gasp!) and then no real conclusion or resolution that makes any sense outside of a convenient set-up for the new, kewler status quo and marketing launch.