Mark Millar's new comic and why it concerns me.

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Nelomaxwell

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While surfing the internet, looking for new comics to read I ran across an Image comic introducing more of Mark Millar’s work to the imprint, following on the heels of a scene in Kick-Ass. This book was called MPH and is about a group of inner city youth from Detroit who find a drug that grants them super speed. But the youths don’t wanna be heroes, no of course not because there’s “Dolla, Dolla Bills to be made ya’ll.”

The fact that the cover features a young Black man and that this is defined as an high-octane “urban” adventure makes me ask two questions. The first is: who thought this was a good idea? There is nothing fun or funny about this, the fact of the matter is it’s pretty (wait for it…) offensive. What provides powers to these “urban” adventurers has to be a drug, and of course instead of doing something noble with it they use it to make money… this reminds me of a statement I read a while back when Miles Morales first appeared stating that he couldn’t be Spider-Man because he was black and wouldn’t care about saving people. I’m paraphrasing but that is the first thing that popped into my head when I read that.

So before the collective voice of mainstream comic book fandom accuses me of being overly sensitive. I’d like to come to my second question, which is: for whoever came up with this blurb (I’m not gonna throw Millar under the bus, because this maybe all Image’s doing), how many African-Americans do they know personally and how many — if any — of them speak like this?

There is a general consensus in the media at large (Thanks to the “rappers” who have abandoned the honorable path of the emcee) that Black folk have an eye for money and anything that can get them more of it. But the media also has a tendency of being more sensational than Spider-Man in the ‘90s, which is what the above quote from the Wu-Tang clan song C.R.E.A.M reminded me of.

It’s 2014 and, though the media isn’t aware of it, there are number of Black people doing things that don’t involve selling drugs – from creating new technology to becoming the youngest certified Mac professional. None of these things are hard to find if you googled them, so why is this, the already derided person, of one group of people what the Kick-Ass scribe chooses to write about?

Is it laziness? Shock value? Personal bias? It could be none of these things but it just makes me wonder what a creator who thinks that comics aren’t for women thinks about Black people?

Could I be completely overreacting about this? Of course I might be, but I expect a seasoned vet like Millar and a company like Image to know better. Again, I’m not attacking them, but who gets behind marketing like this? I doubt companies are doing group studies on what does and does not offend various underrepresented demographics, but come on, do they even care?

Have people become so unimportant to the industry that what is said or how they are portrayed doesn’t matter anymore? I would hope this isn’t the case and if it is, well, thank Anansi for indie comics. Regardless, I’ll keep my eye out for this comic as it gets closer to release, and hope that all of my outrage was ill founded.

Originally published on Comic Bulletin

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Cloakx14

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this sound like a stereotype because they get their powers from drugs.

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kidchipotle

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It kind of sounds like The Bounce. I don't know if he gets his powers from drugs but I know the book focuses on him getting high from weed and the superheroing.

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Nelomaxwell

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kidchipotle

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#5  Edited By kidchipotle

@nelomaxwell: I totally get that. This book is saying drugs will give you superpowers. But comics have been saying that for years. New X-Men did, Ultimate X-Men did, and so did series that aren't X-Men related that I can't think of right now. But this is a fictional universe, obviously drugs aren't going to give people powers in real life. If anything they should change the name from "drugs" to "steroid" .. I dunno. I'm just trying to see it from Millars point of view being that he thrives on "edginess."

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SmashBrawler

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Very good, and true. I'm sure most people will try to claim you're being oversensitive about this but I think a lot of them lose sight of the fact race stereotypes are still very much a thing nowadays. Even more so, they're still a very sensitive subject.

Besides, the concept sounds pretty trite and overdone anyway. People get powers from drugs, use them for personal gain. So original.

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Cloakx14

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#7  Edited By Cloakx14

yeah, i can @Nelomaxwell.

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Nelomaxwell

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#8  Edited By Nelomaxwell

@nelomaxwell: I totally get that. This book is saying drugs will give you superpowers. But comics have been saying that for years. New X-Men did, Ultimate X-Men did, and so did series that aren't X-Men related that I can't think of right now. But this is a fictional universe, obviously drugs aren't going to give people powers in real life. If anything they should change the name from "drugs" to "steroid" .. I dunno. I'm just trying to see it from Millars point of view being that he thrives on "edginess."

Nah, not that. Not talking about the drugs alone, but that's part of it. Words like "Urban" adventure and people quoting Wu-Tang lyrics seem stereotypical couple that with the population and notions people have about Detroit and it seems a little more than offensive because of the drugs.

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RulerOfThisUniverse

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They totally should have gone the "group of women who get strange powers from making sandwiches" route.

In all seriousness, though...that seems really offensive.

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Nelomaxwell

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Very good, and true. I'm sure most people will try to claim you're being oversensitive about this but I think a lot of them lose sight of the fact race stereotypes are still very much a thing nowadays. Even more so, they're still a very sensitive subject.

Besides, the concept sounds pretty trite and overdone anyway. People get powers from drugs, use them for personal gain. So original.

Yeah, its basically a story of urban youth dealing and using drugs, they just tacked superpowers on to them.

They totally should have gone the "group of women who get strange powers from making sandwiches" route.

In all seriousness, though...that seems really offensive.

Don't give Millar any ideas.

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cameron83

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#11  Edited By cameron83

@nelomaxwell: I don't think you're being overly sensitive,because I can definitely see the link(s) as to how you can see it as offensive.

I've actually never seen or heard of this particular comic,but I hope it isn't what it seems. Anyway,I can see where your concerns are based.

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Riddlergeist

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They totally should have gone the "group of women who get strange powers from making sandwiches" route.

In all seriousness, though...that seems really offensive.

Omg.. i can imagine one shoots mayo from her wrists

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The_Deathstroker

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SupremeHyperion

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#14  Edited By SupremeHyperion

Anything and Everything is offensive if you look hard enough (or want to be offended), if it was a bunch of upperclass white kids who get superpowers from snorting a new super drug off the top of a toilet in their parents summer home, then get the ability of mind control, but only use it for getting money (would that be offensive?)

I'm more offended by people actually getting offended by something like this.... and I'm actually interested to read this book.

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DoctorThomasElliot

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Like I always tell people Mark should not try to be edgy, leave that to people who can pull it off like Garth Ennis.

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CheeseSticks

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Nice, thanks, i'll probably buy it!

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Nelomaxwell

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Anything and Everything is offensive if you look hard enough (or want to be offended), if it was a bunch of upperclass white kids who get superpowers from snorting a new super drug off the top of a toilet in their parents summer home, then get the ability of mind control, but only use it for getting money (would that be offensive?)

I'm more offended by people actually getting offended by something like this.... and I'm actually interested to read this book.

You're entitled to your opinion bro, just as I am mine. I'm just trying to open dialogue as a creator who happens to be black I worry about the industries portrayal of my people and I often encourage people to write what they know.

Like I always tell people Mark should not try to be edgy, leave that to people who can pull it off like Garth Ennis.

See If Ennis did something like this I'd be fine because I know he'd do it with some kind of taste, like he did Barracuda.

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danhimself

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I don't know...maybe I'm guilty of stereotyping to but isn't inner city Detroit a prominently black area and aren't drugs and gangs a real problem there?

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buttersdaman000

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#19  Edited By buttersdaman000

A lot of bloggers and writers seem to think Mark Millar is (a little) racist and sexist. Just type his name in google followed by an 'r' or an 's' and look at the first choice. I don't know for sure, but I can definitely see some hints of each...but, maybe thats just because he likes to write 'extreme', 'edgy' books that just come off as lame and in bad taste?

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w0nd

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What I noticed is, there are a lot of cool black comic book characters, that go ignored, the moment there is one shown negatively there is an uproar. Necessary evil was a about a super villain school with a bunch of white kids. People find stereotypes offensive but there are black people who act that way, just like there are white people who act that way. Hell Sentry was pretty much a drug addict.

On the flip side if there is a black person who is written like Carleton from fresh prince, then he is white washed, and not "black" so wtf

Doing black characters are very hard lol, it's lose lose.

I will also say this, if you hate stereotypes thats fine, but if you see someone acting the way that the stereotype act has them ass do you call them out on it?

i KNOW people that act like stereotypical black guys, if you don't act like them they will say you are white, if there is a stereotypical black person in a movie or comic they will get mad at the stereotype, even though they are fuelling the fire by acting that way. In order for stereotypes to exist some one out there has to be acting that way.


I think the story could be interesting but yeah there will be backlash.

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Pperspectiveandreality

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Aside from being offensive, which in my opinion it is, it feels like it's wholly unoriginal. It feels like very little thought went into the development of this as an idea.

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deactivated-5fbfd5d291164

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Honestly, Mark Millar is a pretty awful writer in general. This will be horribly written, rude and unnessarily edgy. Why? Because he can. There will probably be a bad guy that rapes someone because that is just what bad guys do.

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Nelomaxwell

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@w0nd said:

What I noticed is, there are a lot of cool black comic book characters, that go ignored, the moment there is one shown negatively there is an uproar. Necessary evil was a about a super villain school with a bunch of white kids. People find stereotypes offensive but there are black people who act that way, just like there are white people who act that way. Hell Sentry was pretty much a drug addict.

On the flip side if there is a black person who is written like Carleton from fresh prince, then he is white washed, and not "black" so wtf

Doing black characters are very hard lol, it's lose lose.

I will also say this, if you hate stereotypes thats fine, but if you see someone acting the way that the stereotype act has them ass do you call them out on it?

i KNOW people that act like stereotypical black guys, if you don't act like them they will say you are white, if there is a stereotypical black person in a movie or comic they will get mad at the stereotype, even though they are fuelling the fire by acting that way. In order for stereotypes to exist some one out there has to be acting that way.

I think the story could be interesting but yeah there will be backlash.

Yes I do.

You sound like you don't actually read comics with black superheroes in them. I've done a number of reviews with quality black characters. Here

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w0nd

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#24  Edited By w0nd

@nelomaxwell said:

@w0nd said:

What I noticed is, there are a lot of cool black comic book characters, that go ignored, the moment there is one shown negatively there is an uproar. Necessary evil was a about a super villain school with a bunch of white kids. People find stereotypes offensive but there are black people who act that way, just like there are white people who act that way. Hell Sentry was pretty much a drug addict.

On the flip side if there is a black person who is written like Carleton from fresh prince, then he is white washed, and not "black" so wtf

Doing black characters are very hard lol, it's lose lose.

I will also say this, if you hate stereotypes thats fine, but if you see someone acting the way that the stereotype act has them ass do you call them out on it?

i KNOW people that act like stereotypical black guys, if you don't act like them they will say you are white, if there is a stereotypical black person in a movie or comic they will get mad at the stereotype, even though they are fuelling the fire by acting that way. In order for stereotypes to exist some one out there has to be acting that way.

I think the story could be interesting but yeah there will be backlash.

Yes I do.

You sound like you don't actually read comics with black superheroes in them. I've done a number of reviews with quality black characters. Here

It would be very hard to avoid all comics with black characters in them....

I never said i don't acknowledge black super heroes or that I don't read about them. My opening line is there are a lot of cool ones....it would have been a waste of time to list a bunch of comics I read with black characters in them because it is irrelevant to the post I made. The post I made was about people hating stereo types in comics, but the stereotypes have to come from some where.

I am saying that there is always going to be that one comic where the black character is written like a stereo typical black person, or there is a black character written in a negative light. and it's going to anger people. The last issue of Quantum and Wood I read involved a bunch of inbred rednecks, and no one bat an eye at that.

as for the lose lose comment I made it's because I hear things like this frequently

"yeah he's a black character but he doesn't really act black...."

so there is a definitive way to act black? But I am sure if someone who is not of color made their character "act black" then it would be viewed negatively.

I spoke to a girl online who was offended by nintendo...nintendo of all people, because she found it offensive that one of the characters in a mario party game was talking like a stereotypical black person, the whomps i believe....

So on one side you have someone offensive that they are white washing their black characters,

and on the other you have someone who is upset that a cartoon character is talking ghetto.

Luke cage is a great character, I love how he interacts with other characters especially when he was on the avengers., but someone on here called him a sellout and found him very offensive, I won't try to remember his name or bring it up, but he found it offensive that he sold out, ended up with a white woman, and is just another underprivileged black character who went to jail, even though he got his entire backstory wrong.

I don't know why you bold the Carlton post, so I can't really make a response to that

In short, I personally don't find this comic offensive as of yet. I don't think it was intended to be. I think it is just the flip side to peopel getting powers and doing good with them. Virgil ended up with powers and became a super hero in response to a gang war, that wasn't very racist, that's just what it is like growing up in his neck of the woods...to change that would be ridiculous, or replacing those characters with all white people to not upset anyone who may read that and think "this writer is making it seem like all blacks are in a gang"

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Guardiandevil83

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@nelomaxwell: Nolan I feel what your getting at, I don't have to tell you how hilarious it is/was to see black characters in comics written by someone completely out of touch. Yes, there are blacks who live the life that is portrayed in media, however there are more whom do not, yet films, comics, etc, don't show them unless it's to make fun of them. Carlton Banks or Overton of Jamie Foxx fame. It's almost saying, "if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

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CuddleBear

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@nelomaxwell: So would this comic be offensive if Jay Zee wrote it? you know Jay-Z(shortening that for times sake) you know Jay-Z right? An unrepentant crack dealer, who according to him, sold crack not to feed his family but because he wanted "dolla dolla bills" or the flyest kicks. you know Jay-Z right? he was at the presidents inauguration. this is apparently and unfortunately the values of the society we live in now. for all we know this could be based on the life of Jay-Z perhaps Jay-Z hired Mark Millar to write this because Jay-Z is a business man ya know? according to him selling crack is just like running a business. Is that what offends you comrade maxwell or is it that a white dude is writing this? Or is that you want to white wash what is a large and tragic portion of the black community. There is alot of rambling here and alot of offending, i personally like offensive. "the world is too sorry and our time is too short to not be offensive." -says I

i personally would like a black batman that went around knocking out the crack dealers in his community but ya know hopefully this comic will have an arc that goes from selfish to heroic... Jay Zee lacks that arc.

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AllStarSuperman

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#27  Edited By AllStarSuperman

It's Millar

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GraniteSoldier

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#28  Edited By GraniteSoldier

@nelomaxwell: I definitely get how this is offensive and find it offensive myself, although I am personally not a fan of most of Millar's work simply because he tries too hard to come off as "edgy" in my opinion.

But I can't help but ask, would you still find this as offensive if written by a black author?

Now you know me pretty well, and I am not trying to start a flame war, but I am curious because there is often a duality in our society that (in my opinion) lends itself to these types of situations. What I'm saying is blacks and whites both get away with things the other side can't, creating double standards. So if Aaron McGruder, creator of the Boondocks comic strip, had come up with the idea would it honestly still be as offensive?

Personally I'd find it in bad taste and offensive either way, but I'm curious on your honest thoughts on that reversal.

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Wolverine008

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I generally try to ignore race, and just look at people as people, but this is pretty offensive and backwards .

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lykopis

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It's offensive. What an incredibly stupid solicit.

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Moonie

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Mark Millar being as classy as ever, I see. :/

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SaintWildcard

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Bad A$$ cover though

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TDK_1997

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What can I say - Mark Millar at his best.But seriously now I think this really is offensive but not as much as you think.I mean Detroit is a city that has a lot of african americans there and drugs are a problem there as well.

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Nelomaxwell

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@w0nd said:

@nelomaxwell said:

@w0nd said:

What I noticed is, there are a lot of cool black comic book characters, that go ignored, the moment there is one shown negatively there is an uproar. Necessary evil was a about a super villain school with a bunch of white kids. People find stereotypes offensive but there are black people who act that way, just like there are white people who act that way. Hell Sentry was pretty much a drug addict.

On the flip side if there is a black person who is written like Carleton from fresh prince, then he is white washed, and not "black" so wtf

Doing black characters are very hard lol, it's lose lose.

I will also say this, if you hate stereotypes thats fine, but if you see someone acting the way that the stereotype act has them ass do you call them out on it?

i KNOW people that act like stereotypical black guys, if you don't act like them they will say you are white, if there is a stereotypical black person in a movie or comic they will get mad at the stereotype, even though they are fuelling the fire by acting that way. In order for stereotypes to exist some one out there has to be acting that way.

I think the story could be interesting but yeah there will be backlash.

Yes I do.

You sound like you don't actually read comics with black superheroes in them. I've done a number of reviews with quality black characters. Here

It would be very hard to avoid all comics with black characters in them....

I never said i don't acknowledge black super heroes or that I don't read about them. My opening line is there are a lot of cool ones....it would have been a waste of time to list a bunch of comics I read with black characters in them because it is irrelevant to the post I made. The post I made was about people hating stereo types in comics, but the stereotypes have to come from some where.

I am saying that there is always going to be that one comic where the black character is written like a stereo typical black person, or there is a black character written in a negative light. and it's going to anger people. The last issue of Quantum and Wood I read involved a bunch of inbred rednecks, and no one bat an eye at that.

as for the lose lose comment I made it's because I hear things like this frequently

"yeah he's a black character but he doesn't really act black...."

so there is a definitive way to act black? But I am sure if someone who is not of color made their character "act black" then it would be viewed negatively.

I spoke to a girl online who was offended by nintendo...nintendo of all people, because she found it offensive that one of the characters in a mario party game was talking like a stereotypical black person, the whomps i believe....

So on one side you have someone offensive that they are white washing their black characters,

and on the other you have someone who is upset that a cartoon character is talking ghetto.

Luke cage is a great character, I love how he interacts with other characters especially when he was on the avengers., but someone on here called him a sellout and found him very offensive, I won't try to remember his name or bring it up, but he found it offensive that he sold out, ended up with a white woman, and is just another underprivileged black character who went to jail, even though he got his entire backstory wrong.

I don't know why you bold the Carlton post, so I can't really make a response to that

In short, I personally don't find this comic offensive as of yet. I don't think it was intended to be. I think it is just the flip side to peopel getting powers and doing good with them. Virgil ended up with powers and became a super hero in response to a gang war, that wasn't very racist, that's just what it is like growing up in his neck of the woods...to change that would be ridiculous, or replacing those characters with all white people to not upset anyone who may read that and think "this writer is making it seem like all blacks are in a gang"

But not every black person thinks like that, especially not in the black comic book community, like ECBACC, or Onyx Con or MCBAC. Also I know a number of black comic fans who hated Blood Syndicate ect because they were depicting gang and drug activity. I wonder who these people are who say "He's black but doesn't act black." and what characters they say this about? That's such an ignorant thing to say because black people who aren't living in a hole know that their are varying types of black people in the country.

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Nelomaxwell

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@nelomaxwell: I definitely get how this is offensive and find it offensive myself, although I am personally not a fan of most of Millar's work simply because he tries too hard to come off as "edgy" in my opinion.

But I can't help but ask, would you still find this as offensive if written by a black author?

Now you know me pretty well, and I am not trying to start a flame war, but I am curious because there is often a duality in our society that (in my opinion) lends itself to these types of situations. What I'm saying is blacks and whites both get away with things the other side can't, creating double standards. So if Aaron McGruder, creator of the Boondocks comic strip, had come up with the idea would it honestly still be as offensive?

Personally I'd find it in bad taste and offensive either way, but I'm curious on your honest thoughts on that reversal.

I've seen and have admonished black authors for coming up with this kind of thing, they should know better.

@nelomaxwell: So would this comic be offensive if Jay Zee wrote it? you know Jay-Z(shortening that for times sake) you know Jay-Z right? An unrepentant crack dealer, who according to him, sold crack not to feed his family but because he wanted "dolla dolla bills" or the flyest kicks. you know Jay-Z right? he was at the presidents inauguration. this is apparently and unfortunately the values of the society we live in now. for all we know this could be based on the life of Jay-Z perhaps Jay-Z hired Mark Millar to write this because Jay-Z is a business man ya know? according to him selling crack is just like running a business. Is that what offends you comrade maxwell or is it that a white dude is writing this? Or is that you want to white wash what is a large and tragic portion of the black community. There is alot of rambling here and alot of offending, i personally like offensive. "the world is too sorry and our time is too short to not be offensive." -says I

i personally would like a black batman that went around knocking out the crack dealers in his community but ya know hopefully this comic will have an arc that goes from selfish to heroic... Jay Zee lacks that arc.

I don't like Jay-Z. I never did nor have I ever respected him, nor does he in anyway represent the majority of black people in the country. I'm wondering why you think I would be okay with it? Tell me your honest reason. (Waits for you to side step question.)

It's Millar

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I am I'm taking it to task.

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Raiiyn

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#36  Edited By Raiiyn

@supremehyperion said:

Anything and Everything is offensive if you look hard enough (or want to be offended), if it was a bunch of upperclass white kids who get superpowers from snorting a new super drug off the top of a toilet in their parents summer home, then get the ability of mind control, but only use it for getting money (would that be offensive?)

I'm more offended by people actually getting offended by something like this.... and I'm actually interested to read this book.

I'd be offended by that too actually. Stereotypes for upperclass rich kids snorting coke and partying all the time are pretty damn regular. And honestly, playing on stereotypes lack creativity.

@nelomaxwell:

Im kind of interested to see where this goes simply because it is offensive. Its sad really when things like this happen. Overdone and ignorant. Edit: Totally forgot to mention how much I enjoyed your take on it ^.^ Well said m'dear<3

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w0nd

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@nelomaxwell: You are absolutely right, not every black person thinks like that. I don't, that's why I am giving the book a chance before assuming it was meant to be racist. It very well could be how ever.

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Your being oversenceitive

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Nelomaxwell

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@raiiyn: Thank's Momma, I'm just hoping this isn't what it seems like. I'm bothered really by the fact that this is a dude who went on record saying that Comics aren't for Women, so what would his take on people of color be?

@z3ro180 said:

Your being oversenceitive

Can you spell?

@w0nd said:

@nelomaxwell: You are absolutely right, not every black person thinks like that. I don't, that's why I am giving the book a chance before assuming it was meant to be racist. It very well could be how ever.

That's why I said I hope I'm wrong.

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@nelomaxwell: Exactly. Clearly he adheres faithfully to certain social constructs and it wouldn't be surprising that race is one. To be perfectly honest, Im so tired of 'street' stories in general. None of them really portray any of it accurately and half the time things are glamourized or exaggerated. It's annoying.

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w0nd

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@nelomaxwell: Nolan I feel what your getting at, I don't have to tell you how hilarious it is/was to see black characters in comics written by someone completely out of touch. Yes, there are blacks who live the life that is portrayed in media, however there are more whom do not, yet films, comics, etc, don't show them unless it's to make fun of them. Carlton Banks or Overton of Jamie Foxx fame. It's almost saying, "if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

"if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

I have heard different versions of this spoken by black guys to other black guys. As well as if you don't act black you aren't black, if you read comics you aren't black, and so on. The media is only half, the other half are the actual black guys saying this to other black guys (NOT ALL)

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#42  Edited By Nelomaxwell

@raiiyn said:

@nelomaxwell: Exactly. Clearly he adheres faithfully to certain social constructs and it wouldn't be surprising that race is one. To be perfectly honest, Im so tired of 'street' stories in general. None of them really portray any of it accurately and half the time things are glamourized or exaggerated. It's annoying.

That's why "Rappers" piss me off.

@w0nd said:

@guardiandevil83 said:

@nelomaxwell: Nolan I feel what your getting at, I don't have to tell you how hilarious it is/was to see black characters in comics written by someone completely out of touch. Yes, there are blacks who live the life that is portrayed in media, however there are more whom do not, yet films, comics, etc, don't show them unless it's to make fun of them. Carlton Banks or Overton of Jamie Foxx fame. It's almost saying, "if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

"if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

I have heard different versions of this spoken by black guys to other black guys. As well as if you don't act black you aren't black, if you read comics you aren't black, and so on. The media is only half, the other half are the actual black guys saying this to other black guys (NOT ALL)

These people ever hear of Marcus Garvey? or Timothy Drew, or Malcolm X? or any other educated Black man ever? They sound like all their ideas of blackness come from the media.

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@nelomaxwell: It's not just them. It's a combination of things really.

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Honestly I think Mark Millar is better than this. He can write some genuinely good stories (doesn't mean he always will). But this just sounds like...blah. Forget it being an offensive premise. Its a boring one. Talking about beating a dead horse. If you're going to write a story involving urban youth, make it cool and unique and fun. Case in point Attack the Block.

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#45  Edited By Nelomaxwell

@raiiyn said:

@nelomaxwell: It's not just them. It's a combination of things really.

I'm aware. But I feel based on what Hip-Hop was and what it has devolved into they should know better.

Honestly I think Mark Millar is better than this. He can write some genuinely good stories (doesn't mean he always will). But this just sounds like...blah. Forget it being an offensive premise. Its a boring one. Talking about beating a dead horse. If you're going to write a story involving urban youth, make it cool and unique and fun. Case in point Attack the Block.

That's another thing. This seem so lazy for a guy who wrote Red Son. Millar should be able to do better, why isn't he? That's what's so offensive, I've heard people call him a hack but damn, he maybe proving them right.

Good movie btw.

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@nelomaxwell: Yeah, it's like there are two different Mark Millar's. the one who gives us Red Son or the one who wrote Wanted. I hear great things about Starlight and Jupiter's Legacy, but I didn't bother picking em up because its such a luck of the draw. And who is the audience for MPH. I'm white, I don't want to read this. I have several black friends who are comic readers. They're not going to want to read this. Who is the demographic here?

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Nelomaxwell

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@nelomaxwell: Yeah, it's like there are two different Mark Millar's. the one who gives us Red Son or the one who wrote Wanted. I hear great things about Starlight and Jupiter's Legacy, but I didn't bother picking em up because its such a luck of the draw. And who is the audience for MPH. I'm white, I don't want to read this. I have several black friends who are comic readers. They're not going to want to read this. Who is the demographic here?

Good question. I'm not a fan of "Urban" Adventures or drugs, I don't know any creators in the circles I travel in who would dig this at all.

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#48  Edited By GraniteSoldier

@nelomaxwell: Then I respect your stance on the matter. Like I said previously it bothers me when double standards are brought into play, because that tends to perpetuate further problems. I'm an across the board type person, double standards bother me to no end, so I'm glad to hear you'd feel the same regardless.

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@raiiyn said:

@nelomaxwell: Exactly. Clearly he adheres faithfully to certain social constructs and it wouldn't be surprising that race is one. To be perfectly honest, Im so tired of 'street' stories in general. None of them really portray any of it accurately and half the time things are glamourized or exaggerated. It's annoying.

That's why "Rappers" piss me off.

@w0nd said:

@guardiandevil83 said:

@nelomaxwell: Nolan I feel what your getting at, I don't have to tell you how hilarious it is/was to see black characters in comics written by someone completely out of touch. Yes, there are blacks who live the life that is portrayed in media, however there are more whom do not, yet films, comics, etc, don't show them unless it's to make fun of them. Carlton Banks or Overton of Jamie Foxx fame. It's almost saying, "if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

"if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

I have heard different versions of this spoken by black guys to other black guys. As well as if you don't act black you aren't black, if you read comics you aren't black, and so on. The media is only half, the other half are the actual black guys saying this to other black guys (NOT ALL)

These people ever hear of Marcus Garvey? or Timothy Drew, or Malcolm X? or any other educated Black man ever? They sound like all their ideas of blackness come from the media.

That's what I'm saying! And then by acting that way they are giving people who buy into stereotypes ammunition.

I really like this speech from bill cosby

They're standing on the corner and they can't speak English. I can't even talk the way these people talk: Why you ain't, Where you is, What he drive, Where he stay, Where he work, Who you be... And I blamed the kid until I heard the mother talk. And then I heard the father talk.

Everybody knows it's important to speak English except these knuckleheads. You can't be a doctor with that kind of crap coming out of your mouth. In fact you will never get any kind of job making a decent living.

People marched and were hit in the face with rocks to get an education, and now we've got these knuckleheads walking around. The lower economic people are not holding up their end in this deal. These people are not parenting. They are buying things for kids. $500 sneakers for what? And they won't spend $200 for Hooked on Phonics.

I am talking about these people who cry when their son is standing there in an orange suit. Where were you when he was 2? Where were you when he was 12? Where were you when he was 18 and how come you didn't know that he had a pistol? And where is the father? Or who is his father?

People putting their clothes on backward: Isn't that a sign of something gone wrong? People with their hats on backward, pants down around the crack, isn't that a sign of something? Or are you waiting for Jesus to pull his pants up? Isn't it a sign of something when she has her dress all the way up and got all type of needles [piercing] going through her body?

What part of Africa did this come from? We are not Africans. Those people are not Africans; they don't know a thing about Africa. With names like Shaniqua, Taliqua and Mohammed and all of that crap, and all of them are in jail.

Brown or black versus the Board of Education is no longer the white person's problem. We have got to take the neighborhood back. People used to be ashamed. Today a woman has eight children with eight different 'husbands' — or men or whatever you call them now. We have millionaire football players who cannot read. We have million-dollar basketball players who can't write two paragraphs. We as black folks have to do a better job. Someone working at Wal-Mart with seven kids, you are hurting us. We have to start holding each other to a higher standard.

We cannot blame the white people any longer.

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/cosby.asp#YrZDlIViMGjF4Phw.99

http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/cosby.asp

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#50  Edited By Nelomaxwell

@w0nd said:

@nelomaxwell said:

@raiiyn said:

@nelomaxwell: Exactly. Clearly he adheres faithfully to certain social constructs and it wouldn't be surprising that race is one. To be perfectly honest, Im so tired of 'street' stories in general. None of them really portray any of it accurately and half the time things are glamourized or exaggerated. It's annoying.

That's why "Rappers" piss me off.

@w0nd said:

@guardiandevil83 said:

@nelomaxwell: Nolan I feel what your getting at, I don't have to tell you how hilarious it is/was to see black characters in comics written by someone completely out of touch. Yes, there are blacks who live the life that is portrayed in media, however there are more whom do not, yet films, comics, etc, don't show them unless it's to make fun of them. Carlton Banks or Overton of Jamie Foxx fame. It's almost saying, "if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

"if you don't speak like a street kid, then you won't get laid and you must be a square".

I have heard different versions of this spoken by black guys to other black guys. As well as if you don't act black you aren't black, if you read comics you aren't black, and so on. The media is only half, the other half are the actual black guys saying this to other black guys (NOT ALL)

These people ever hear of Marcus Garvey? or Timothy Drew, or Malcolm X? or any other educated Black man ever? They sound like all their ideas of blackness come from the media.

That's what I'm saying! And then by acting that way they are giving people who buy into stereotypes ammunition.

I really like this speech from bill cosby

They're standing on the corner and they can't speak English. I can't even talk the way these people talk: Why you ain't, Where you is, What he drive, Where he stay, Where he work, Who you be... And I blamed the kid until I heard the mother talk. And then I heard the father talk.

Everybody knows it's important to speak English except these knuckleheads. You can't be a doctor with that kind of crap coming out of your mouth. In fact you will never get any kind of job making a decent living.

People marched and were hit in the face with rocks to get an education, and now we've got these knuckleheads walking around. The lower economic people are not holding up their end in this deal. These people are not parenting. They are buying things for kids. $500 sneakers for what? And they won't spend $200 for Hooked on Phonics.

I am talking about these people who cry when their son is standing there in an orange suit. Where were you when he was 2? Where were you when he was 12? Where were you when he was 18 and how come you didn't know that he had a pistol? And where is the father? Or who is his father?

People putting their clothes on backward: Isn't that a sign of something gone wrong? People with their hats on backward, pants down around the crack, isn't that a sign of something? Or are you waiting for Jesus to pull his pants up? Isn't it a sign of something when she has her dress all the way up and got all type of needles [piercing] going through her body?

What part of Africa did this come from? We are not Africans. Those people are not Africans; they don't know a thing about Africa. With names like Shaniqua, Taliqua and Mohammed and all of that crap, and all of them are in jail.

Brown or black versus the Board of Education is no longer the white person's problem. We have got to take the neighborhood back. People used to be ashamed. Today a woman has eight children with eight different 'husbands' — or men or whatever you call them now. We have millionaire football players who cannot read. We have million-dollar basketball players who can't write two paragraphs. We as black folks have to do a better job. Someone working at Wal-Mart with seven kids, you are hurting us. We have to start holding each other to a higher standard.

We cannot blame the white people any longer.

Read more at http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/cosby.asp#YrZDlIViMGjF4Phw.99

http://www.snopes.com/politics/soapbox/cosby.asp

I agree, but this is a bigger problem that we as a people need to address together. Do I think us having heroes helps yes I do, but where the hell was his generation? This didn't just appear with the advent of Hip-Hop or crack or anything like that this was a slow burn, it didn't just happen over night. No we can't blame white people but we can blame those who came before us. Also Mohammaed is a north African name, Bill Cosby doesn't know what he's talking about. Also you're welcome to join us at The Black People thread

@granitesoldier said:

@nelomaxwell: Then I respect your stance on the matter. Like I said previously it bothers me when double standards are brought into play, because that tends to perpetuate further problems. I'm an across the board type person, double standards bother me to no end, so I'm glad to hear you'd feel the same regardless.

I do. Black creators would and should know better. We're doing different things in engineering and science that most of the world doesn't see because either they don't care or are't told.