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#1 Posted by modernww2fare (6881 posts) - - Show Bio

What can Disney learn from non-MCU marvel movies like Fox's X-Men and Raimi's Spider-Man?

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#2 Posted by mrmonster (13589 posts) - - Show Bio

This is gonna sound cynical, but I think the main takeaways from other Marvel movies are what NOT to to. For example, don't make Galactus a giant cloud, don't mess up your timeline beyond the point of it making any sense at all, and don't cast teenagers as the Fantastic Four.

This is not to say that other Marvel movies are not good. I personally think the two best Marvel movies ever made aren't even from Marvel Studios (Logan and Deadpool 2). I'm just saying that the MCU can learn a lot more from past mistakes than anything else.

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#4 Posted by RL4 (1700 posts) - - Show Bio
  • Don't mute the color palette
  • Don't rely on CGI villains
  • Make memorable villains, stop killing them off
  • Emphasize teamwork where appropriate
  • Don't crank out generic punching match fight scenes
  • Make the music count, it needs to be bold, and placed strategically, not a white noise.
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#5 Posted by Veshark (10448 posts) - - Show Bio

I think the modern MCU movie is a huge step up from the old Fox X-films and even the Raimi Spidey films, much as I love em. The only thing that Fox seems to be doing “better” is to create more experimental and risky takes on the superhero genre with projects like New Mutants, Logan, and Deadpool, but I feel like the mainstream MCU/Disney brand can’t really go down that niche, and to their credit they also have the Netflix shows which do veer to a more grownup audience.

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#6 Posted by just_sayin (3082 posts) - - Show Bio

From X-Men, you can learn to have villains who are not one dimensional. For example Magneto and Mystique.

From Fantastic Four, you can learn that changing a character's ethnicity may cause "buzz", but a horrible script will kill a franchise.

From Fantastic Four, you can learn what not to do to create a strong villain. Galactus and Dr Doom should have been two of the best villains of all time, but instead, they were two of the worst.

From Deadpool and the Deadpool in Wolverine: Origins - learn that you must stay true to the character for the character to be a success. One version of Deadpool is well loved and the other is despised.

From Raimi's Spider-Man learn that sometimes you should stop after the second film if you don't have a good script.

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#7 Edited by Stormdriven (17375 posts) - - Show Bio

SPIDER-MAN’S FIGHT/SWING SCENES FROM THE RAIMI TRILOGY AND ASM

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#8 Posted by LEGACY6364 (7408 posts) - - Show Bio

@rl4 said:
  • Don't mute the color palette
  • Don't rely on CGI villains
  • Make memorable villains, stop killing them off
  • Emphasize teamwork where appropriate
  • Don't crank out generic punching match fight scenes
  • Make the music count, it needs to be bold, and placed strategically, not a white noise.
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#9 Posted by Michaelbn (1897 posts) - - Show Bio

don't force cheesy humor and non-intresting character with a cliche plot.

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#10 Posted by Magian (150441 posts) - - Show Bio

Mostly not to force the humour that much.

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#11 Posted by SocaJunkie (7849 posts) - - Show Bio

Not much.

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#12 Posted by CosmicMuffin (460 posts) - - Show Bio

@rl4:

Those were kinda problems of the past.

-The movies recently have had very memorable music. Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, and Infinity War all had incredible music. Doctor Strange and Guardians Vol. 2 were not as memorable, but on a rewatch you can realize the score is much more than “white noise”. Black Panther is still a front runner in Best Original Score at the Oscars this year, don’t be surprised if it’s the first superhero film to get nominated in that category since Superman (1978)

-I don’t think the “make memorable villains” point really counts anymore. We have had multiple great villains—Vulture, Killmonger, and Thanos—with 2 surviving on to appear in future movies. I’d also include Zemo, Ego and Hela in that list. While they are not at the levels of the best in the MCU, compare them to some of the atrocities in Phase 2 such as Yellowjacket and Malekeith and you’ll see a clear difference. Surely the MCU is starting to fix their villain problem.

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#13 Edited by CosmicMuffin (460 posts) - - Show Bio

They can learn from X-Men: Days of Future Past and learn that they can erase a plot element / timeline that was not well received by fans so they can get a second chance.

They can learn from the Raimi Spider-Man films by realizing if you are going to make a Spider-Man trilogy, it’s very important to have strong supporting characters. As funny as Ned is, I don’t know if he feels like anything more than comic relief. His whole crew of friends at school just seem weak and uninteresting.

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#14 Posted by Veshark (10448 posts) - - Show Bio

@cosmicmuffin: I don’t think the original Raimi trilogy had a particularly strong supporting cast either. MJ was a generic love interest, Harry was the generic best friend, Aunt May the generic wise old lady etc. JJJ was basically comic relief, too.

I love those Raimi movies but unless I’m missing something, I don’t think the supporting cast was a strength in the original trilogy. If anything, Homecoming has done more to endear its supporting cast with one film than Raimi did with three films.