Avatar image for boombox
#1 Posted by boombox (156 posts) - - Show Bio
No Caption Provided
No Caption Provided

Avatar image for worldofthunder
#2 Edited by Worldofthunder (5055 posts) - - Show Bio

Heat of a neutron star: 600 000 degrees. Thor endured through this heat for an extended amount of time in which he ended up as charcoal and dead had it not been for Stormbreaker healing him.

Heat at the core a nuke: 50-150 million degrees. Clark's skin tissue no-sold this heat while he was weakened (hair wasn left unscathed) and probably would have died due to his cells getting completely drained had it not been for the sun but that's the source of his nutrients so it doesn't really matter. Clark's body was durable to resist getting his atoms torn apart and destroyed. That in itself makes him much more durable than Thor.

The whole point of that star forge part of the movie was to produce enough heat to disform uru and form it into Stormbreaker's shape. Heat was the whole focus of that feat. How much blunt force the beam was putting out isn't hard to find out either. Earlier we saw that Thor casually tore apart the metal on the star forge. The same metal wasn't damaged when hit with the star's beam. We know that the blunt force of that beam wasn't stronger than Thor's own physical strenght and durability meaning that feat and exposure to that beam was pure heat, or minimal blunt force at the least considering the beam didn't damage something Thor himself managed to do with his feet. Saying Thor took any meaningful amount of blunt force is lying to yourself.

TL;DR: Clark's body was durable to resist getting his atoms torn apart and destroyed. That in itself makes him much more durable than Thor.

Avatar image for stefano
#3 Posted by Stefano (2521 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor’s feat is better. A credible character stated that Thor would take the full force of a star. what more does the movie need to do for feats to be considered valid?

Avatar image for DammeFavour
#4 Edited by DammeFavour (8292 posts) - - Show Bio

What do you think would happen to you if heat close to a million degrees were passing over your head? Well it certainly didn't happen with the star beam

Avatar image for macleen
#5 Posted by macleen (3289 posts) - - Show Bio

I was wondering when this would show up

Avatar image for drpepperman
#6 Posted by DrPepperMan (6288 posts) - - Show Bio

You can find online that the nuke Superman was hit with was a LogiczBreaker nuke. This means that the nuke did the following.

-reality warped.

-erased the four fundamental forces of nature.

-turned every atom in the area to a supernova exploding.

-carried 9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 ^9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 degrees Kelvin for the whole process.

-carried radiation.

Superman no sold all of that except the radiation, he clearly is superior to this who almost died after being exposed to 40 degrees Celsius for 0.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 femtoseconds from a car sized star that had a force of 0.01 Newtons when traveling at ten miles per second when the beam was 00.00000000000001 inches per millennia.

Get with the facts people.

Avatar image for thanosii
#7 Posted by thanosii (3119 posts) - - Show Bio

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Avatar image for deactivated-5b728068f211c
#8 Posted by deactivated-5b728068f211c (7069 posts) - - Show Bio

No matter what feats Thor gets, Supes nuke feat will always be better.

Avatar image for thunderprince
#9 Posted by ThunderPrince (6938 posts) - - Show Bio

@thanosii said:

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Avatar image for chimeroid
#10 Posted by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@thanosii said:

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Pretty sure that is a guess TBH. However, i do agree that Thor's feat was more impressive due to the incredible amount of heat he had to withstand. And yes, it takes even blunt force durability to handle that amount of heat and keep your molecules together.

Avatar image for theycallmebt
#11 Posted by TheyCallMeBT (1019 posts) - - Show Bio

@thanosii said:

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Pretty sure that is a guess TBH. However, i do agree that Thor's feat was more impressive due to the incredible amount of heat he had to withstand. And yes, it takes even blunt force durability to handle that amount of heat and keep your molecules together.

Add in the fact that actual concussive force was also shown after Thor passed out and was blasted away.

Avatar image for theycallmebt
#12 Posted by TheyCallMeBT (1019 posts) - - Show Bio

They were both impressive to be honest, I'm just here to see how nonsensical the arguments get lol.

Avatar image for chimeroid
#13 Posted by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid said:
@thanosii said:

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Pretty sure that is a guess TBH. However, i do agree that Thor's feat was more impressive due to the incredible amount of heat he had to withstand. And yes, it takes even blunt force durability to handle that amount of heat and keep your molecules together.

Add in the fact that actual concussive force was also shown after Thor passed out and was blasted away.

And, as i said in other threads, that concussive force can easily be quantified by the fact that we saw how far and how fast thor was blasted away. It wasn't more than a couple hundred tons.

Avatar image for theycallmebt
#14 Edited by TheyCallMeBT (1019 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid said:
@theycallmebt said:
@chimeroid said:
@thanosii said:

Power output of a neutron star is equal to detonating every nuke on earth x 1000000 per second

Pretty sure that is a guess TBH. However, i do agree that Thor's feat was more impressive due to the incredible amount of heat he had to withstand. And yes, it takes even blunt force durability to handle that amount of heat and keep your molecules together.

Add in the fact that actual concussive force was also shown after Thor passed out and was blasted away.

And, as i said in other threads, that concussive force can easily be quantified by the fact that we saw how far and how fast thor was blasted away. It wasn't more than a couple hundred tons.

Which is still a lot of force and in itself solidifies Thor holding onto the levers as a several hundred ton strength feat at the very least.

Avatar image for chimeroid
#15 Posted by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@theycallmebt: I would say it is a several thousand ton feat IMHO.I mean, imagine getting pummeled by the weight for a full minute.

Avatar image for theycallmebt
#16 Posted by TheyCallMeBT (1019 posts) - - Show Bio

@theycallmebt: I would say it is a several thousand ton feat IMHO.I mean, imagine getting pummeled by the weight for a full minute.

Yeah that's why I said at the very least and that's without factoring in Thor actual opening and holding open the forge Iris itself.

All together it should be in the hundreds of thousands of tons, if not millions all depending on how much strength it takes to open the gate.

Avatar image for ganon15
#17 Posted by ganon15 (7076 posts) - - Show Bio

@macleen said:

I was wondering when this would show up

Avatar image for chimeroid
#18 Posted by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid said:

@theycallmebt: I would say it is a several thousand ton feat IMHO.I mean, imagine getting pummeled by the weight for a full minute.

Yeah that's why I said at the very least and that's without factoring in Thor actual opening and holding open the forge Iris itself.

All together it should be in the hundreds of thousands of tons, if not millions all depending on how much strength it takes to open the gate.

I wouldn't be willing to make that leap just yet. It didn't seem like opening the iris was difficult to him. I would stick to several thousand tons.

Avatar image for theycallmebt
#19 Posted by TheyCallMeBT (1019 posts) - - Show Bio

@theycallmebt said:
@chimeroid said:

@theycallmebt: I would say it is a several thousand ton feat IMHO.I mean, imagine getting pummeled by the weight for a full minute.

Yeah that's why I said at the very least and that's without factoring in Thor actual opening and holding open the forge Iris itself.

All together it should be in the hundreds of thousands of tons, if not millions all depending on how much strength it takes to open the gate.

I wouldn't be willing to make that leap just yet. It didn't seem like opening the iris was difficult to him. I would stick to several thousand tons.

It was actually visibly more difficult for him than pulling the giant ring apart with Rocket's ship and that ring should be a lot more than several thousand tons.

Avatar image for geraltsopinion
#20 Edited by GeraltsOpinion (391 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor's feat. Just Google the energy output of a neutron star.

It's not close

Avatar image for rl4
#21 Posted by RL4 (1700 posts) - - Show Bio

The Star...obviously.

Avatar image for rukelnikovftw
#22 Edited by RukelnikovFTW (6131 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid: when you do the calc, remember adding the neutron star's gravity as an opposing force to the distance Thor was moved, I think it may do a substantial difference

Avatar image for amcu
#23 Posted by Amcu (16281 posts) - - Show Bio

I think I'll take the full force of a star over a nuke.

Avatar image for malkavthemaven
#24 Posted by MalkavtheMaven (466 posts) - - Show Bio

Well lets figure it out.
The nuke at the hottest is around 200 million Fahrenheit we can find this through simple google searches of the heat of a nuke.

Now to find the heat of the Neutron star, well thats a little different. We need to find the luminosity of our sun.
That is one L or 382,800,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 Watts(Or joules) of power per second.
Now a Neutron star is only 0.25 (25%) as luminos as our star.
So that is 95,700,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 watts (or Joules) of power per second. But that is likely a full powered star.
Lets say this star is only at 10% of its Luminosity (10 percent of the 95.7 Septillion watts)
That is 9,570,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 Watts so basically cutting it down to low end numbers its 9.5 Septillion watts of power that the star puts out per second. Now normally this is distributed over the entirety of the star itself. But this ring and iris are suppose to focus it.

But because we do see the star is glowing lets only only 50% of the luminosity is making it to the iris.
So thats 4,785,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 Watts (Or Joules) per second.

Since we have people saying that this beam is all about heat lets figure that heat shall we?
That is 3,4657619425e+23 Kelvin. Or 346,576,194,250,000,000,000,000 Sextillion Kelvin or 623,837,149,649,999,933,000,000 Fahrenheit

Which one sounds hotter?

Avatar image for gaoron
#25 Posted by Gaoron (8345 posts) - - Show Bio

What do you think would happen to you if you get hit by a full force of a neutron star for couple minutes? Well it certainly didn't happen with the puny nuke Supes took.

Avatar image for gazool
#26 Posted by Gazool (1229 posts) - - Show Bio

A good look at the title gives you the answer.

Avatar image for chimeroid
#27 Edited by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@rukelnikovftw: except that the shot clearly didnt show any gravity at work there. We saw rocket, groot, eitri, and a bunch of other stuff casually walking/lying around without being pulled towards the star.

Avatar image for chimeroid
#28 Posted by Chimeroid (9237 posts) - - Show Bio

@malkavthemaven: or we can just google the heat of a neutron star and see it is 600,000k

Avatar image for gxrevs06
#29 Posted by GXrevs06 (4430 posts) - - Show Bio

Clark's feat is superior and it's not even close

Avatar image for rebake
#30 Posted by Rebake (3897 posts) - - Show Bio

@gxrevs06 said:

Clark's feat is superior and it's not even close

saying it's not even close instantly ruins your credibility...

Avatar image for malkavthemaven
#31 Posted by MalkavtheMaven (466 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid: That would be standard radiating heat. But since we know this is suppose to focus the light and heat of the star we would have to take its entire luminosity into consideration at one point not distributed evenly across its surface. That is also taking into consideration that we see the star still shining close to its surface. So I calculated using 50% of the stars Luminosity (Which is only 25% of our sun to begin with, so roughly 12.5% our suns Luminosity) into finding the amount of watts/joules per second. It works on the same general principal as a laser you take the photons and get them flowing in a single direction does more work (Energy) than if the light was scattered.

Avatar image for tonymartial
#32 Posted by TonyMartial (8840 posts) - - Show Bio

Wow a nuke is hotter? Never knew that.

Avatar image for malkavthemaven
#33 Posted by MalkavtheMaven (466 posts) - - Show Bio

Fun facts from Nasa

https://history.nasa.gov/conghand/nuclear.htm < This is what happens when you detonate a nuke in a vacuum and they explain that the Blast and the Heat are pretty much gone. Since a bomb's radiation is only 15% of its potential joules, this means Superman was KOed by 15% of the energy from a 300 Kiloton bomb.

https://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/ask/q2136.html < Nasa states here that Space begin at 100 KM or roughly 62 miles in space.

So the arguments of "They weren't in space" seem to be wrong. And because of that the blast and thermal release that is being touted pretty much gone. So all Superman 'Tanked' was 15% of the energy and it according to Zack Snyder damn near killed him.

Avatar image for boombox
#35 Posted by boombox (156 posts) - - Show Bio
Avatar image for DammeFavour
#36 Posted by DammeFavour (8292 posts) - - Show Bio

@malkavthemaven: except it wasn't in a vacuum as the blast was visible from Earth

Avatar image for helloman
#37 Posted by Helloman (28624 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor's feat.

Avatar image for kanyecosby
#38 Posted by KanyeCosby (6973 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor’s is a better heat resistance feat. Although a neutron star isn’t as hot as a nuke, Thor survived the heat much longer than Superman did. It is probably a better energy projection feat. However, this feat doesn’t demonstrate star level durability for Thor, unless people believe that Thor can no sell planet busting attacks. Superman took more concussive force than what Thor was hit with.

Online
Avatar image for malkavthemaven
#39 Posted by MalkavtheMaven (466 posts) - - Show Bio

@DammeFavour: https://nerdist.com/heres-what-a-nuclear-bomb-detonating-in-space-looks-like/ < This is a bit of interesting info. Remember the explosion they show is 250 miles up.

Avatar image for thanosii
#40 Posted by thanosii (3119 posts) - - Show Bio

Full force of a nuetron star vs a Nuke guys really

Avatar image for malkavthemaven
#41 Posted by MalkavtheMaven (466 posts) - - Show Bio

@kanyecosby: Not from the Nuke he didn't. Without a medium to spread the blast force is basically nullified. It would be totally different if the Nuke happened in Earths Atmosphere. But they were clearly stated to be in Space by the characters in the movie, their displays on screen, etc. The heat and blast would be virtually nonexistent because there is nothing to propagate them. And Doomsday took a good chunk of that force too. We can't keep pretending Doomsday and Superman tanked 1 full Nuke when both of them where there and taking up energy to be effected. With it mostly just radiation it means Superman was KOed by less than 15% of the energy that is normally produced.

Avatar image for the_wotan
#42 Posted by The_Wotan (573 posts) - - Show Bio

LMAO.

Thor's feat, of course.

Avatar image for heatforce
#43 Posted by Heatforce (5939 posts) - - Show Bio

Calcing out these feats is one thing but if we are taking statements into account then Superman is planetary.

Avatar image for batman242
#44 Posted by Batman242 (11260 posts) - - Show Bio

I think they'd survive each other's feats.

Avatar image for DammeFavour
#45 Posted by DammeFavour (8292 posts) - - Show Bio

Wouldn't the full force of a star completely drain the star?

Avatar image for heatforce
#46 Edited by Heatforce (5939 posts) - - Show Bio

@DammeFavour: bingo, hence why the statement is hyperbole. DCEU fans would be laughed at if we took Batman's statement from Justice League seriously.

Avatar image for monsterstomp
#47 Posted by MonsterStomp (36709 posts) - - Show Bio

Who cares? Both nearly died. Why people insist on using showings that nearly killed them, I will never know. Surviving things aren't impressive.

Its like if Batman was hit by a semi-truck and ended up in hospital for the next 12 months. Ya'll be like "Batman tanked a semi".

Avatar image for rbt
#48 Posted by RBT (27236 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor in terms of heat and Superman in blunt force. Thor is still more durable of two though.

Avatar image for batman242
#49 Posted by Batman242 (11260 posts) - - Show Bio

Fun facts from Nasa

https://history.nasa.gov/conghand/nuclear.htm < This is what happens when you detonate a nuke in a vacuum and they explain that the Blast and the Heat are pretty much gone. Since a bomb's radiation is only 15% of its potential joules, this means Superman was KOed by 15% of the energy from a 300 Kiloton bomb.

https://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/ask/q2136.html < Nasa states here that Space begin at 100 KM or roughly 62 miles in space.

So the arguments of "They weren't in space" seem to be wrong. And because of that the blast and thermal release that is being touted pretty much gone. So all Superman 'Tanked' was 15% of the energy and it according to Zack Snyder damn near killed him.

I've argued before that they were in the upper atmosphere based on the map in the bunker the Generals were in.

The heat clearly wasn't gone either since there's a fireball in the air that's dissipating and Doomsday falls out of said fireball engulfed in flames.

Avatar image for rukelnikovftw
#50 Edited by RukelnikovFTW (6131 posts) - - Show Bio

@chimeroid said:

@rukelnikovftw: except that the shot clearly didnt show any gravity at work there. We saw rocket, groot, eitri, and a bunch of other stuff casually walking/lying around without being pulled towards the star.

Ok, so we are clearly in the realm of not conventional physics, since a star, neutron or otherwise, that close, would generate a pretty important grvitational field. And yet, you insist the force of the beam can be calced. How can this be? If our physics don't apply, they don't apply period, we can't assume some part of them works, and another doesn't, so either we calc it using all of our physics (gravity included), or we don't.