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#1 Posted by BabyDarkseid (1907 posts) - - Show Bio

what do u guys think?

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#2 Posted by deactivated-5a84a212043e5 (2790 posts) - - Show Bio

Well they ought to be in at least one way or another.

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#3 Posted by deactivated-5b2121a0a9a00 (10000 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes but the hero wins most of the time due to plot.

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#4 Posted by SC (17818 posts) - - Show Bio

Given how many heroes and villains exist in fiction, even just comics, 'usually' is a tricky to apply here. Generally speaking, stories like to have conflict in them, which can often come from challenge, and so having an antagonist that challenges a protagonist, often achieves that. So having the antagonist be stronger than a protagonist, can lead to a greater challenge, and reflect well on the protagonist/protagonists. However conflict and challenge can be achieved many other ways, without a villain, sometimes the challenge presented by the villain isn't necessary via strength, it may be money, influence, charisma, intellect, so on. Also sometimes numbers, as in many heroes have villains that are weaker, but act in groups, and then vice versa, some groups of heroes have singular villains that are really powerful on their own… so lots of variables to consider.

I wouldn't think it controversial to say many heroes have to face villains that are stronger though.

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#5 Posted by tj849 (8569 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes but the hero wins most of the time due to plot.

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#6 Posted by Superhero24 (4748 posts) - - Show Bio

yes. They usually are.

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#7 Posted by Kevd4wg (11783 posts) - - Show Bio

In some way yes or it would be a bland villain and wouldn't work. Now this wouldn't necessarily be physically stronger, but mentally stronger, richer, etc.

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#8 Posted by seastone98 (4482 posts) - - Show Bio

Sometimes most times da villains r just dere evil equals

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#9 Edited by StrongTower7 (257 posts) - - Show Bio

In many cases, yes. For example, Venom is technically stronger than Spider-Man in terms of physicals. At times, Reverse Flash whoops Barry so bad that I can't help but wonder why he isn't the Flash instead. Even more demoralizing, Reverse Flash has mastered his powers inside and out and can actually justify every action he takes---albeit through bitterness and spite---with pretty reasonable/relatable motives. That's more than I can say for Barry many times, and this is my favorite DC superhero we're talking about here.

Not all villains are stronger than their heroic counterparts, but the ones that are are special. These special villains are meant to bring the best out of the hero, to cause their true greatness to come to fruition. These special villains make the hero fully realize their potential, and the hero can only defeat them once they become who they were always meant to be. Just my 2 cents!

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#10 Posted by maxxcveiler (1013 posts) - - Show Bio

Aizen

Yhwach

Thanos

Dark Archer(against S1 Ollie)

CW Reverse Flash

Madara

Zeref

Akainu

Negan

Lucifer

Yeah id say most are

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#11 Posted by Devilmenworks (708 posts) - - Show Bio

It makes writing easier to have a villain stronger than a hero but it not a necessity. For example, most of Batman's villains are weaker than him (Joker, Riddler, Penguin, Two Face, Mr. Zsasz, Carmine Falcon, Black Mask etc). You just need a strong source of conflict to challenge your hero.

@sc said:

Given how many heroes and villains exist in fiction, even just comics, 'usually' is a tricky to apply here. Generally speaking, stories like to have conflict in them, which can often come from challenge, and so having an antagonist that challenges a protagonist, often achieves that. So having the antagonist be stronger than a protagonist, can lead to a greater challenge, and reflect well on the protagonist/protagonists. However conflict and challenge can be achieved many other ways, without a villain, sometimes the challenge presented by the villain isn't necessary via strength, it may be money, influence, charisma, intellect, so on. Also sometimes numbers, as in many heroes have villains that are weaker, but act in groups, and then vice versa, some groups of heroes have singular villains that are really powerful on their own… so lots of variables to consider.

I wouldn't think it controversial to say many heroes have to face villains that are stronger though.

And this is pretty spot on as well.

So far in the manga One Punch Man, Saitama hasn't came across a single villain who he could not defeat. This would seem contradictory since none of the villains can really challenge him. However his sources of conflict come in the forms of

Not being popular, not being able to rank up his hero status fast enough, being unpopular/disliked by the common people, having his work credited to other heroes etc.

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#12 Posted by kyrees (13371 posts) - - Show Bio

they should be or they wouldn't be much of a threat to be a villain.

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#13 Posted by deactivated-5a89ca5697052 (8063 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes.

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#14 Edited by LDM (5359 posts) - - Show Bio

90% of the time to make a good story of heroes overcoming the odd. If they weren't stronger then they would be much smarter

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#15 Posted by Roverlord (46 posts) - - Show Bio

Well, usually, because the heroes cannot win easily