Question for sensitive people

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THORSON

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#1  Edited By THORSON

Would it be too offensive to create a disabled/special needs hero that hunts/fights demons?

I want to create a demon hunter similar to vampires and zombie hunters. Obviously I won't be making it extreme they will be kind of like Mephisto and Surtur with people turning into demonic like beings. It won't include anything that is based on satanism.

Would this be too extreme to have a disabled person (Who will get powers) hunt down demons?

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cbishop

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@thorson: Not sure why this is even an issue. Not extreme at all.

  • Donald Blake walked with a cane before finding the hammer of Thor, and even after, when he turned back to Donald Blake.
  • Mark Millar's Superior was a kid in a wheelchair.
  • Freddie Freeman was on a crutch when he got the power of Shazam.
  • In Marvel's horrible 1993 annuals, several of the new characters introduced had a disability before gaining their powers. It's not the disabilities that made the annuals horrible, that's just me spouting my opinion of the annuals.
  • Professor X is the world's strongest telepath, but his legs don't work, so he's in a wheelchair.
  • So is The Chief, of the Doom Patrol.
  • And don't forget Oracle.

There's plenty more, but that's what my sleep-deprived brain can come up with immediately.

It seems like the question you're really asking is: will it add anything to the story? And that's a question you should ask. More importantly: does it add anything to the character? If you're just adding a disability to grab attention, it's going to be lame (no pun intended). If it's for irony, like Professor X's strong mind but weak body, then cool. Any instance of weak made strong works pretty well, but you've got to treat it honestly. If Professor X is on the third floor when the building catches on fire, either his wheelchair needs to be able to fly (which should be established well before hand), or someone else is going to have to save him, because the elevators are going to be disabled, and he can't take the stairs.

So does it add anything? If so, go for it.

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THORSON

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@cbishop said:

@thorson: Not sure why this is even an issue. Not extreme at all.

  • Donald Blake walked with a cane before finding the hammer of Thor, and even after, when he turned back to Donald Blake.
  • Mark Millar's Superior was a kid in a wheelchair.
  • Freddie Freeman was on a crutch when he got the power of Shazam.
  • In Marvel's horrible 1993 annuals, several of the new characters introduced had a disability before gaining their powers. It's not the disabilities that made the annuals horrible, that's just me spouting my opinion of the annuals.
  • Professor X is the world's strongest telepath, but his legs don't work, so he's in a wheelchair.
  • So is The Chief, of the Doom Patrol.
  • And don't forget Oracle.

There's plenty more, but that's what my sleep-deprived brain can come up with immediately.

It seems like the question you're really asking is: will it add anything to the story? And that's a question you should ask. More importantly: does it add anything to the character? If you're just adding a disability to grab attention, it's going to be lame (no pun intended). If it's for irony, like Professor X's strong mind but weak body, then cool. Any instance of weak made strong works pretty well, but you've got to treat it honestly. If Professor X is on the third floor when the building catches on fire, either his wheelchair needs to be able to fly (which should be established well before hand), or someone else is going to have to save him, because the elevators are going to be disabled, and he can't take the stairs.

So does it add anything? If so, go for it.

The issue is, i want to create a demon hunter who has Progeria (An aging disorder) who is adopted by the head demon's daughter (She is good). And I don't have any objective to offend anyone but at the same time I don't think publishers would find it acceptable. (Because I want to try an publish the book I'm writing).

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cbishop

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@thorson: Have you read some of the stuff in similar stories? They won't have a problem with it.

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THORSON

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@cbishop said:

@thorson: Have you read some of the stuff in similar stories? They won't have a problem with it.

Thanks...

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#6 BumpyBoo  Moderator

Sounds a lot like this character from Dark Tower:

http://darktower.wikia.com/wiki/Stanley_Ruiz

Totally mean that as a compliment too, I think a character like that written well is a real treat when you find one. Gotta say, I agree with cbishop here. As long as you write your hero as a real person, and your heart is in the right place, I don't see what would be disrespectful about your story. Stories about disabled people really only come off as disrespectful when written in an offensive tone, i.e. in a patronising or condescending way, or written so that the reader can feel superior to and look down on them for being handicapped. And even then, that can be used as a plot device highlighting prejudice by holding up a mirror to it and showing it for what it is, in which case it isn't offensive anymore anyway.

TLDR: Go for it. Do good research, have respect for the character and the real people with similar conditions, and you'll be fine :)