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#1 Posted by FFP (433 posts) - - Show Bio

So, this is a fight between hypotetic fighters, that happen in a street. There are no rules, but let's consider the fighters won't take the fight to the ground, nor use dirty moves, like kicking the balls, biting, etc.

It's a bare knuckle fight, in a limited, but not too small area, something of the size of a boxing ring. Both fighters are experts on their respective fight style and are allowed to use any techniques they want (except the ones I said above). Bloodlusted and no morals, fight ends with K.O.

Also, both fighters with 1,80 m height and 80 kg weight.

Who wins?

No Caption Provided

Muay Thai

No Caption Provided

Or boxing?

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#2 Edited by jayc1324 (26421 posts) - - Show Bio

They are both standing/striking martial arts, and both are very effective in real life situations. But I think I would have to give the edge to the MT fighter though, because of the clinch and the use of kicks, especially low kicks. Knees in the clinch would be devastating too, and the boxer would probably not be able to get out of it. The boxer can control the distance and spacing with footwork and jabs, and can get in some good combos that could work, but the kicking ability from MT would probably be able to overcome that more often than not and close the gap for some elbows.

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#3 Posted by AllStarSuperman (43020 posts) - - Show Bio

If movies have taught me anything, it's that the fancier looking, the more effective. Flying reverse elbow kick spin > a punch.

Online
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#4 Posted by HeroUp2112 (18173 posts) - - Show Bio

If movies have taught me anything, it's that the fancier looking, the more effective. Flying reverse elbow kick spin > a punch.

lol

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#5 Posted by HeroUp2112 (18173 posts) - - Show Bio

As with most everything the individual fighter counts for a LOT in such situations, but I'll do my best to assess this based on styles.

Both are extremely effective street fighting systems and have a lot going for them. I was going to get into the wheres, whys, possible situations, and all but I'll try to summarize.

Boxing has the advantage of being MUCH faster, and the ability to deliver a lot of punishment in a short amount of time. Disadvantage, it's not that difficult to damage your weapons (fists) without protection (tape or some kind of reinforcing glove), which can take you out of the fight in a heart beat.

Muay Tai. Slower and, except for some of the kicks, tends to require closer distances than boxing for the greatest effect. HOWEVER, once within optimal distance very damaging and effective power comes into play. Also, little known fact, the human elbow can be SEVERELY damaged and still be used effectively as a weapon (assuming you can deal with the pain), the knees have a similar attribute except that the fighter isn't required to STAND on the elbows. Disadvantages. The more effective techniques tend to require very close distances, and some of the VERY effective techniques (the arial ones in particular) tend to take time. Also, getting a light footed and quick boxer into position to use knees and elbows could become difficult in a STREET fight.

Overall I'd probably have to say MT has the advantage, mainly due to its versatility though not by much. I once saw a Chinese boxer (he kicked a LITTLE too, but mainly he just punched the hell out of the guy) just DECIMATE an MT stylist...it was impressive to watch.

SWAGing this at 6/10 in favor of MT.

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#6 Edited by Paytience (4743 posts) - - Show Bio

Generally speaking at the very highest levels, I would give it to the boxer PROVIDED the boxer is not a philly shell or point stylist. If so, they get leg chopped into oblivion. So, Pacquiao could win it, Mayweather would lose.

At most other competitive levels however, I give it to the thai stylist. They can be weak to well angled punches, however if the boxer doesn't have good angular movement going forward, and doesn't have the explosiveness to compensate, which is almost any boxer journeyman or below, then the Thai fighter cuts their ability to take angles with leg kicks, and teeps them until they get tired of trying to jab in. A big advantage to the this fighterhere is that the punching style is much more forgiving on their hands, and the added limbs mean they always have an offense. Boxers run a real risk of breaking their hands.

Both are combat proven styles that have a strong fundamental base and a focus on Randori. Under these conditions, the ability to control the fight, and tendencies of the individual become more important. Overall, in a best of 10, boxing vs Muay Thai whould split almost dead evenly. Muay Thai takes away angles while boxers dominate them, and Muay Thai's range control is countered by the superior timing and precision of the highest level boxers. When there is no threat of a shot, there is no real clear way either imposes their will based strictly on a style vs style between the two. Individual comparisons between fighters would have to be done.

In a war of attrition however, vote Muay Thai. Boxers need a perfect punch to knock them out, but muay thai strikes can hurt you even if they land badly. Block a muay thai kick? That boxer just got an arm broken potentially. The Thai fighters tendency to take the large nerve clusters and the core with straight attacks means that if the boxer can't finish him early, he almost certainly isn't going to have the power or precision to do it later.

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#7 Posted by Tayssti (1320 posts) - - Show Bio

@jayc1324 said:

They are both standing/striking martial arts, and both are very effective in real life situations. But I think I would have to give the edge to the MT fighter though, because of the clinch and the use of kicks, especially low kicks. Knees in the clinch would be devastating too, and the boxer would probably not be able to get out of it. The boxer can control the distance and spacing with footwork and jabs, and can get in some good combos that could work, but the kicking ability from MT would probably be able to overcome that more often than not and close the gap for some elbows.

Yeah pretty much this.

Whats starting distance? If they start around arms length from one another the boxer has a better chance from the start. He can use his better hand speed, likely better striking power, better head movement and foot work to throw combos and work angles and try to maintain that distance. Its going to be hard to get off leg kicks and elbows when your repetitively getting clocked in the chin. If the distance between both fighters widens the boxer is going to have to worry about low leg kicks that he hasn't trained for.

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#8 Edited by Paytience (4743 posts) - - Show Bio

@heroup2112 said:

As with most everything the individual fighter counts for a LOT in such situations, but I'll do my best to assess this based on styles.

Both are extremely effective street fighting systems and have a lot going for them. I was going to get into the wheres, whys, possible situations, and all but I'll try to summarize.

Boxing has the advantage of being MUCH faster, and the ability to deliver a lot of punishment in a short amount of time. Disadvantage, it's not that difficult to damage your weapons (fists) without protection (tape or some kind of reinforcing glove), which can take you out of the fight in a heart beat.

Muay Tai. Slower and, except for some of the kicks, tends to require closer distances than boxing for the greatest effect. HOWEVER, once within optimal distance very damaging and effective power comes into play. Also, little known fact, the human elbow can be SEVERELY damaged and still be used effectively as a weapon (assuming you can deal with the pain), the knees have a similar attribute except that the fighter isn't required to STAND on the elbows. Disadvantages. The more effective techniques tend to require very close distances, and some of the VERY effective techniques (the arial ones in particular) tend to take time. Also, getting a light footed and quick boxer into position to use knees and elbows could become difficult in a STREET fight.

Overall I'd probably have to say MT has the advantage, mainly due to its versatility though not by much. I once saw a Chinese boxer (he kicked a LITTLE too, but mainly he just punched the hell out of the guy) just DECIMATE an MT stylist...it was impressive to watch.

SWAGing this at 6/10 in favor of MT.

I disagree on Muay Thai being slower, and the range is between the two is about the same. The boxers longest strike being the rear hand straight, (yes, the rear hand has grater range than a jab, I PROMISE. It's the hip turn...) and for Muay Thai it's the rear leg teep. (Forward teep requires a lean back, or bent knee to keep balance/power even). Both of these are about the same reach, with the teep having a slight advantage in both speed and range. Reason being is that the target is generally closer...the lead hip, thigh and knee are the target for a teep, and all three of these things sit forward of the head, and more importantly, closer to the attacking foot.

For all other things, the range is about the same. A round kick is done at the exact same range as a jab or check hook because the impact area is the shin, not the foot. The kicks also tend to come fast, especially when talking leg kicks for the same reason as the teep...range is closer for the lower body. But also because, unless we're talking throwing alternating power in the dutch style, Muay thai chambers it's kicks off the last punch. So a dutch stylist will throw a right hand, and alternate to a left kick. A Thai stylis will throw right to right, as the right hand set's up the release for the right kick by bringing it across the body in one motion. Punches will come faster than an american stylist, maybe, but for a thai stylis it's about the same. Your throwing left right, the thai guy is throwing right, right.

^^^Dunno if you know what I mean there exactly.

As for the chinese one, I'll take your word for it. The only time I've seen a chinese or korean fighter win that, is when they are facing off against "Muay Thai" fighters who were also from China or low level leagues, or were just not very good. With the exception of Cung Le, I have never see a chinese or korean stylis beat a Thai fighter of any legitimacy. Do you have a video for it? Or was this a personal experience?

Sorry, not tryna be aggressive either. But I like discussing with you on certain subjects.

I think it was Shannon Briggs, if I remember right, was think =ing about MMA, and he went over and did a K1 fight. He knocked the guy out I believe in the first, but when it was over, he was done with it. He said something along the lines of "yeah, I put him away, but that was most painful thing I have ever done. I'm not ever doing this again". Something of the sort...not even sure it was him, but it was a champ level HW who went to K1 for 1 round and decidedly immediately that he doesn't wanna do it anymore.

Edit: This isn't the interview I was thinking of, but here he is talking to Joe Rogan about it.
(That's right, he fought Tom Erikson I THINK right after Erikson fought in Pride.

Loading Video...

The funny thing Erikson is a WRESTLER who he fought in K1, and he did that to his legs. Thai kicks ain't no joke.

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#9 Posted by alucardvanwayne1800 (1588 posts) - - Show Bio

Knowing a bit of both myself (more MT than boxing) i'd say MT but its going to be hard boxers condition the heck our of their upper body to take hits but i dont think they could handle those knees or elbows especially to the biceps but thats assuming the MT fighter can get close enough which if they can land a strong enough kick to the chest knocking them to the wall or ropes they can close that gap quick and devistate but that boxer needs to keep them hands up his endurance a durability are key in winning this

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#10 Posted by CramAndman (1665 posts) - - Show Bio

@heroup2112: Of course the individual practitioner is important but I agree that MThai has the stylistic edge. It's a combat system where you're using all four limbs offensively and defensively vs a fighting style where you're only using your hands. There have been exhibition fights between MT fighters and boxers as well as MT fighters and Kickboxers. The MT fighters usually win. Boxers don't have any defense against leg kicks, since they don't train to block them and are often hobbled after a few rounds, compromising their ability to move, block and punch with power. Kickboxers do better but often have trouble with the clinch and leg kicks.

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#11 Posted by OneWithReason (775 posts) - - Show Bio

I gotta go with Art of 8 Limbs

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#12 Posted by Usha (3494 posts) - - Show Bio

Going with the Muay Thai fighter with the edge of kicking the boxers legs in. Breaking them down.

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#13 Posted by FFP (433 posts) - - Show Bio

Starting distance is about 2 meters, as anything too close would be a first to hit K.O.

I also believe MT gets the majority. Lots of people says that kicking isn't effective in a street fight, what you think?

I disagree on Muay Thai being slower, this depend on the fighter. Also, isn't teeps and kicks range greater than straight punches? Could the Muay keep distance with kicks? What about the boxer grabing the feet, since he has no gloves?

Off topic: what's exactly the difference between Muay Thai nd kickboxing? I've read that it's the elbows and lower body kicks, but saw kickboxers doing that, so...

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#14 Edited by D33tacude (70 posts) - - Show Bio

@ffp: While both are tested and proven ways of fighting Muay Thai does not limit itself to punching, it utilizes the entire body including the edge of the body- fist, feet, knee, elbow- and even uses many grappling techniques.

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#15 Edited by Marishtar (2038 posts) - - Show Bio

@alucardvanwayne1800 said:

Knowing a bit of both myself (more MT than boxing) i'd say MT but its going to be hard boxers condition the heck our of their upper body to take hits but i dont think they could handle those knees or elbows especially to the biceps but thats assuming the MT fighter can get close enough which if they can land a strong enough kick to the chest knocking them to the wall or ropes they can close that gap quick and devistate but that boxer needs to keep them hands up his endurance a durability are key in winning this

I know a bit more about boxing, and agree.

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#16 Posted by dbzaota482 (534 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai for sure... way more deadly.

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#17 Edited by D33tacude (70 posts) - - Show Bio

@ffp That being said I've never heard of a Muay Thai Practionor on the level that Ali was in boxing or the Gracy Brothers were in Jiu-Jitsu, but you still have brilliant fighters such as Saenchai to grace the sport, who will always be my favorite Muay Thai Master.

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#18 Posted by Royal_Warrior (5060 posts) - - Show Bio

..... This fight is pointless

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#19 Posted by Cosmic_Templar (2571 posts) - - Show Bio

Definitely Muay Thai because of use of other limbs apart from fists.

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#20 Posted by lettsplay10 (20589 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai

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#21 Posted by Rockette (5678 posts) - - Show Bio
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#22 Posted by Ungas123 (319 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai, because of Low Kick.

Low Kick easily disrupts Boxers's tempo.

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#23 Posted by FFP (433 posts) - - Show Bio

@d33tacude:

Yes, I also do miss some model Muay Thai fighter as Tyson is in boxing, to me. And the ones I know aren't too good with their hands, which is a part of the sport that I really like. People talk about Samart, but he doesn't impress me.

About the topic, consider two equally traines masters, you don't have to consider the boxer an Ali or Tyson. Or you could just consider both fighters with something less than 3 years training. The point is that they should have the same train intensity and experience time and not being noob.

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#24 Posted by mrmonster (14701 posts) - - Show Bio

These types of questions are hard to answer, because it all depends on skill level. A really good boxer could beat an okay muay thai fighter, and a really good muay thai fighter could beat an okay boxer. It's all about the fighter, not the style.

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#25 Edited by Rockette (5678 posts) - - Show Bio

@rockette said:

@royal_warrior:

How so?

Not disagreeing with you, just ... curious.

I'll tell you why I ask this.

.

When 2 people of different combat styles but equal skill come together in an equal terms fight, it can literally go either way 50/50, unless one of those said skills was created to directly counter the other.

That is NOT the case here.

.

Technical gibberish, BS, & blah-blah-blah aside, you can take the most technically and badass (in the ring) fighters ever, and in an actual fight on the streets, it will quickly turn into a no-holds-barred scrap & wrestling match more than anything.

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#26 Edited by Wewlad80 (3411 posts) - - Show Bio

Anyone with any Idea of how Martial arts mix should know this is a dead 50/50. Maybe the Boxer, Just due to throwing more necessary hits for maximum damage. But then again the muay thai guy is most likely just going to adopt similar strikes and a generic Brawling style since this is a street fight, Not a Competitive League fight.

I doubt any seasoned Muay Thai practitioner is going to be interested in risking any fancy moves in a unregulated fight.

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#27 Edited by mrmonster (14701 posts) - - Show Bio

@wewlad80 said:

Anyone with any Idea of how Martial arts mix should know this is a dead 50/50. Maybe the Boxer, Just due to throwing more necessary hits for maximum damage. But then again the muay thai guy is most likely just going to adopt similar strikes and a generic Brawling style since this is a street fight, Not a Competitive League fight.

I doubt any seasoned Muay Thai practitioner is going to be interested in risking any fancy moves in a unregulated fight.

True. The biggest myth about martial artists is that in real fights, we go for what's fancy over what's effective. I've taken taekwondo and jiu-jitsu, so I know a lot of fancy moves, but am I ever going to use those in a real fight? No, I'd just use what's simple and practical.

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#28 Posted by Rockette (5678 posts) - - Show Bio

@wewlad80 said:

Anyone with any Idea of how Martial arts mix should know this is a dead 50/50. Maybe the Boxer, Just due to throwing more necessary hits for maximum damage. But then again the muay thai guy is most likely just going to adopt similar strikes and a generic Brawling style since this is a street fight, Not a Competitive League fight.

I doubt any seasoned Muay Thai practitioner is going to be interested in risking any fancy moves in a unregulated fight.

True. The biggest myth about martial artists is that in real fights, we go for what's fancy over what's effective. I've taken taekwondo and jiu-jitsu, so I know a lot of fancy moves, but am I ever going to use those in a real fight? No, I'd just use what's simple and practical.

Looks like I'm not alone in knowing how real fights work, on the street.

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#29 Posted by Thorthunder98 (6613 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai much more weapons at their disposal and Boxer has no training defending kicks and a leg kick if you're not used to checking them can really mess up your leg and a head kick can clean knock you out boxer isn't trained to defend those sorts of things

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#30 Posted by mrmonster (14701 posts) - - Show Bio

@rockette said:
@mrmonster said:
@wewlad80 said:

Anyone with any Idea of how Martial arts mix should know this is a dead 50/50. Maybe the Boxer, Just due to throwing more necessary hits for maximum damage. But then again the muay thai guy is most likely just going to adopt similar strikes and a generic Brawling style since this is a street fight, Not a Competitive League fight.

I doubt any seasoned Muay Thai practitioner is going to be interested in risking any fancy moves in a unregulated fight.

True. The biggest myth about martial artists is that in real fights, we go for what's fancy over what's effective. I've taken taekwondo and jiu-jitsu, so I know a lot of fancy moves, but am I ever going to use those in a real fight? No, I'd just use what's simple and practical.

Looks like I'm not alone in knowing how real fights work, on the street.

Yeah. A lot of non-martial artists just do not understand that there are plenty of factors to consider besides what specific style you've taken. As I said, it all depend on skill level. Even some actual martial artists I've talked to don't seem to understand this.

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#31 Posted by Saiyan77 (2135 posts) - - Show Bio

That assuming that both are top level of there sports or crafts the MMA fIghter in a street fight should win 7.5/10 fights

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#32 Posted by comicace3 (12429 posts) - - Show Bio

Who ever gets lucky enough for a KO i guess. I'd back the MT specialist cuz range and damage soak.

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#33 Edited by mrmonster (14701 posts) - - Show Bio

@saiyan77 said:

That assuming that both are top level of there sports or crafts the MMA fIghter in a street fight should win 7.5/10 fights

This was between a muay thai fighter and a boxer.

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#34 Posted by HeroUp2112 (18173 posts) - - Show Bio

@heroup2112 said:

As with most everything the individual fighter counts for a LOT in such situations, but I'll do my best to assess this based on styles.

Both are extremely effective street fighting systems and have a lot going for them. I was going to get into the wheres, whys, possible situations, and all but I'll try to summarize.

Boxing has the advantage of being MUCH faster, and the ability to deliver a lot of punishment in a short amount of time. Disadvantage, it's not that difficult to damage your weapons (fists) without protection (tape or some kind of reinforcing glove), which can take you out of the fight in a heart beat.

Muay Tai. Slower and, except for some of the kicks, tends to require closer distances than boxing for the greatest effect. HOWEVER, once within optimal distance very damaging and effective power comes into play. Also, little known fact, the human elbow can be SEVERELY damaged and still be used effectively as a weapon (assuming you can deal with the pain), the knees have a similar attribute except that the fighter isn't required to STAND on the elbows. Disadvantages. The more effective techniques tend to require very close distances, and some of the VERY effective techniques (the arial ones in particular) tend to take time. Also, getting a light footed and quick boxer into position to use knees and elbows could become difficult in a STREET fight.

Overall I'd probably have to say MT has the advantage, mainly due to its versatility though not by much. I once saw a Chinese boxer (he kicked a LITTLE too, but mainly he just punched the hell out of the guy) just DECIMATE an MT stylist...it was impressive to watch.

SWAGing this at 6/10 in favor of MT.

I disagree on Muay Thai being slower, and the range is between the two is about the same. The boxers longest strike being the rear hand straight, (yes, the rear hand has grater range than a jab, I PROMISE. It's the hip turn...) and for Muay Thai it's the rear leg teep. (Forward teep requires a lean back, or bent knee to keep balance/power even). Both of these are about the same reach, with the teep having a slight advantage in both speed and range. Reason being is that the target is generally closer...the lead hip, thigh and knee are the target for a teep, and all three of these things sit forward of the head, and more importantly, closer to the attacking foot.

For all other things, the range is about the same. A round kick is done at the exact same range as a jab or check hook because the impact area is the shin, not the foot. The kicks also tend to come fast, especially when talking leg kicks for the same reason as the teep...range is closer for the lower body. But also because, unless we're talking throwing alternating power in the dutch style, Muay thai chambers it's kicks off the last punch. So a dutch stylist will throw a right hand, and alternate to a left kick. A Thai stylis will throw right to right, as the right hand set's up the release for the right kick by bringing it across the body in one motion. Punches will come faster than an american stylist, maybe, but for a thai stylis it's about the same. Your throwing left right, the thai guy is throwing right, right.

^^^Dunno if you know what I mean there exactly.

As for the chinese one, I'll take your word for it. The only time I've seen a chinese or korean fighter win that, is when they are facing off against "Muay Thai" fighters who were also from China or low level leagues, or were just not very good. With the exception of Cung Le, I have never see a chinese or korean stylis beat a Thai fighter of any legitimacy. Do you have a video for it? Or was this a personal experience?

Sorry, not tryna be aggressive either. But I like discussing with you on certain subjects.

I think it was Shannon Briggs, if I remember right, was think =ing about MMA, and he went over and did a K1 fight. He knocked the guy out I believe in the first, but when it was over, he was done with it. He said something along the lines of "yeah, I put him away, but that was most painful thing I have ever done. I'm not ever doing this again". Something of the sort...not even sure it was him, but it was a champ level HW who went to K1 for 1 round and decidedly immediately that he doesn't wanna do it anymore.

Edit: This isn't the interview I was thinking of, but here he is talking to Joe Rogan about it.

(That's right, he fought Tom Erikson I THINK right after Erikson fought in Pride.

Loading Video...

The funny thing Erikson is a WRESTLER who he fought in K1, and he did that to his legs. Thai kicks ain't no joke.

The Chinese boxer thing was from a video taped fight sometime in the late 90s early turn of the century...it MIGHT be online, I don't know. I WILL say that except for below the waist kicks I've NEVER met, heard of, or seen someone with "fast feet" (relative term) strike quicker above the waist than someone with "fast hands". The range increase from a round house kick might make up for it, but (me personally from TKD...MT round house kicks my work differently/be more effective) they're not nearly the "kick of choice". As for the left punch/right kick combo, this is basically why I think the MT edges out the Boxer a bit as long as the kicks are mostly aimed at the boxer's legs. The boxer is still going to be faster (if only a bit, but they add up) with his fists than the MT fighter is with his fist and feet (above the waist). Plus, part of MT street fighting IS chopping down the opponent's legs. I agree Thai kicks ain't no joke. Knees either. On the other hand, boxers punches ain't no joke either. On average they punch about a quarter to a third harder than the average "martial artist" if you take my meaning.

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#35 Edited by Ouroborik (3370 posts) - - Show Bio

If movies have taught me anything, it's that the fancier looking, the more effective. Flying reverse elbow kick spin > a punch.

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#36 Posted by Paytience (4743 posts) - - Show Bio

@ffp: I don't like to use whort term fighters for comparisons. At the highest levelsn it is more dependent on the individual fighter, but the lowest fighters are not fair representatives of the art.

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#37 Posted by FFP (433 posts) - - Show Bio

@wewlad80 said:

Anyone with any Idea of how Martial arts mix should know this is a dead 50/50. Maybe the Boxer, Just due to throwing more necessary hits for maximum damage. But then again the muay thai guy is most likely just going to adopt similar strikes and a generic Brawling style since this is a street fight, Not a Competitive League fight.

I doubt any seasoned Muay Thai practitioner is going to be interested in risking any fancy moves in a unregulated fight.

True. The biggest myth about martial artists is that in real fights, we go for what's fancy over what's effective. I've taken taekwondo and jiu-jitsu, so I know a lot of fancy moves, but am I ever going to use those in a real fight? No, I'd just use what's simple and practical.

I agree with you. That's the reason of my doubt about kicks in real fights. Maybe leg kicks could be relevant. Also, elbows and clinch is not fancy, they are effective and would probably give the MT an edge especially because fist can break easily and elbos/shins don't.

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#38 Posted by kgb725 (18409 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai easily. Muay Thai is literally more dangerous everywhere Thai Plumb > punches

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#39 Edited by Raziel2014 (1259 posts) - - Show Bio

it depends on the individual, if they are both newbies meaning few months of training then the one with Boxing will win most of the fights as Boxing is very effective for beginners as its easy to learn and because is mostly punching your motion and strength will increase faster than full body with muy thai if the time spent is minimal, if they are both expert/advance fighters meaning 10 years+ then it depends on their skill/technique level the boxer will without a doubt have a faster and more destructive punch from any martial arts, but the muy thai is a dangerous style as it uses elbow, knees, legs etc, the body and endurance of the fighters is also a question that comes into play.

there is no such thing as a better style of fighting than another is the person who is using the technique and for what the technique is being used for that matters, at the end of the day combat experience is what truly decides who wins and losses.

a person who has fought in the streets and fought battles underground with his life on the line will win any fight against a person who has never trully been in a situation where there life was in danger regardless of what style he or she is using, so be it boxing, muy thai, karate, kun fu etc, if you want to practice a style of fighting it all depends on preference and what fits your body best, this is why a style that your body itself creates is better suited in the long run of course no ordinary person can create their unique style of fighting unless they fight hundreds/thousands of battles.

if you have strong upper body and genetic weak legs then something like boxing is better suited, i know alot of people with chicken legs and no amount of training will remove it, against a truly talent genetic leg freak.

if you have good genetics and good balance upper body and lower body than muy thai is better suited, you also need to take time into account, if you just want to have great body and ability to protect yourself without having to spend many years then boxing is the best way of fighting anyone can learn, if you are going for the long ride then muay thai is better suited out of the two as it has more to offer.

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#40 Posted by SirFizzWhizz (37749 posts) - - Show Bio

Overall I'd probably have to say MT has the advantage, mainly due to its versatility though not by much. I once saw a Chinese boxer (he kicked a LITTLE too, but mainly he just punched the hell out of the guy) just DECIMATE an MT stylist...it was impressive to watch.

VIDEO! VIDEO!

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#41 Posted by HeroUp2112 (18173 posts) - - Show Bio

@heroup2112 said:

Overall I'd probably have to say MT has the advantage, mainly due to its versatility though not by much. I once saw a Chinese boxer (he kicked a LITTLE too, but mainly he just punched the hell out of the guy) just DECIMATE an MT stylist...it was impressive to watch.

VIDEO! VIDEO!

I don't even know if it's on the internet, I'll try to find it.

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#42 Posted by Raziel2014 (1259 posts) - - Show Bio

it depends on the individual, if they are both newbies meaning few months of training then the one with Boxing will win most of the fights as Boxing is very effective for beginners as its easy to learn and because is mostly punching your motion and strength will increase faster than full body with muay thai if the time spent is minimal, if they are both expert/advance fighters meaning 10 years+ then it depends on their skill/technique level the boxer will without a doubt have a faster and more destructive punch from any martial arts, but the muay thai is a dangerous style as it uses elbow, knees, legs etc, the body and endurance of the fighters is also a question that comes into play.

there is no such thing as a better style of fighting than another is the person who is using the technique and for what the technique is being used for that matters, at the end of the day combat experience is what truly decides who wins and losses.

a person who has fought in the streets and fought battles underground with his life on the line will win any fight against a person who has never trully been in a situation where there life was in danger regardless of what style he or she is using, so be it boxing, muay thai, karate, kun fu etc, if you want to practice a style of fighting it all depends on preference and what fits your body best, this is why a style that your body itself creates is better suited in the long run of course no ordinary person can create their unique style of fighting unless they fight hundreds/thousands of battles.

if you have strong upper body and genetic weak legs then something like boxing is better suited, i know alot of people with chicken legs and no amount of training will remove it, against a truly talent genetic leg freak.

if you have good genetics and good balance upper body and lower body than muay thai is better suited, you also need to take time into account, if you just want to have great body and ability to protect yourself without having to spend many years then boxing is the best way of fighting anyone can learn, if you are going for the long ride then muay thai is better suited out of the two as it has more to offer.

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#43 Edited by Kundelar (524 posts) - - Show Bio

Limiting one fighter to boxing only is really not fair unless he is a significantly more seasoned fighter than the other combatant is. Boxing is hands only while MT uses all limbs including bows and alternate hand strikes.

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#44 Posted by HeroUp2112 (18173 posts) - - Show Bio

DISCLAIMER! This is NOT the fight I was talking about, I can't find it. A few important things to note about this video.

  • The Shaolin fighter isn't the same guy but I'd bet money he's either or student of his, or they trained in the same place or something.
  • In the original fight I've mentioned the fight didn't even last a minute. The Shaolin "boxer" threw almost no foot techniques he just through insanely accurate punches from a variety of positions, even when the Muay Thai opponent was down and trying to cover up.
  • While this is a bad ass fight, the fight I was talking about had no clinch breaks, so they were able to go at each other and not be broken up (I'm sure SOME kind of "illegal" contact or something would have resulted in that, but not clinching apparently).
  • This fight actually a decent argument both for AND against my claims, but definitely backs up my position on the individual practitioner matters as much (or more) than the style.
  • Again, this is a pretty cool fight (Billed as the "The Fight of the Century) between "The Monk" Yi Long and Muay Thai "Legend" (Which he might be, I've just never heard of him) Buakaw Banchamek and took place in Jiyuan, China...I don't know the year.
  • I completely agree with the decision in this fight.
  • Enjoy.
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#45 Edited by Usha (3494 posts) - - Show Bio

@heroup2112: That was quite a beautiful fight. I liked how that Muay Thai guy slowly adapted to his opponent's fighting style and began using those sweep kicks.

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#46 Posted by Saiyan77 (2135 posts) - - Show Bio

@mrmonster: I just consider most martial arts that could be MMA over boxing but the Muay Thai fighter more likely wins

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#47 Edited by Zokologue (336 posts) - - Show Bio
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#48 Posted by deactivated-5a853424245e3 (4168 posts) - - Show Bio
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#49 Posted by JokerBat88 (982 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Thai would be the more effective art in the fight. You can keep your opponent at bay much easier with push kicks. Fighting on the inside, MT allows for more devastating strikes such as elbows and clinch. Clinch can be used for numerous strikes including knees, elbows and punches. The use kicks puts a major advantage into the mix as well. Doesn't even have to be mid to high kicks, a low kick taking out the legs could destroy the boxer right there. Boxing is an amazing sport and requires amazing speed and technique as does MT but MT is the better art.