Beware the Wrath of Anu! last edited by pikahyper on 03/12/19 01:50AM View full history

In a Corinthian city, Conan encounters a past ally and fellow thief. But when Conan and Burgan descend on the Temple of Anu, a hellish man-bull is awakened…and his rage is fully stoked!

Conan and Jenna are involved in an altercation with soldiers, who refuse them entrance into the city, being suspious of their buisness. As the group argue, more passing soldiers led by Captain Aron, call for aid as they have cornered two thieves on a rooftop...

Conan tussles with a gaurd about to shoot the thieves down and a struggle begins. The thieves help Conan by dropping a brick onto the head of one of the Cimmerian`s assailants. Conan makes his escape with the two thieves, calling to Jenna that they will meet up behind the Temple of Anu...

The pursuing soldiers are afraid and cannot enter the sacred temple as the thieves slip inside. Once inside, Conan recognises one of the thieves as Burgun, the Gunderman that Conan believed killed when they both took flight from the destruction of Lanjau (see Conan the Barbarian v.1,#8). His younger companion is Igon.

In the temple they meet a fat priest who acts as a fleece for the stolen goods that Burgun provides for him. The priest shows them a shimmering spiral, a stairway to `the very stars`, and from this the group suddenly glimpse a terrifying vision of the huge Bull of Anu, the monstous being that acts as an avenger for the god,Anu...

The priest quickly dispels the form,and the thieves depart. they meet Jenna, who seems to take a liking to the youth, Igon.

Conan and Burgun strike up a partnership and they begin a spree of robberies around the city. Burgun suggests they try a more ambitious theft - against Nabonidus the Red Priest, the real ruler of the city, despite the puppet king who sits on the throne...

They break into Nabonidus` official residence, but Conan, fearing sorcery, takes only a dagger-belt, despite the wealth scattered around. The thieves depart...

Soon after, Nabonidus is aware of the theft and threatens the gaurds that he insists the culprits are caught immediately.

The soldiers led by Captain Aron have been informed by the fat priest at the temple. They ambush Conan and Burgun on the temple steps and a fight commences. Conan escapes, but Burgun is overwhelmed and captured. Conan vows his rescue and vanishes into the night...

The following morning, in a tavern, Conan is enraged by

Jenna and Igon`s disregard for the capture of Burgun. A street urchin tells Conan that Burgun`s execution is about to take place. The Cimmerian rushes to the square - but, too late - and he witnesses the Gunderman executed at a public hanging. Conan sees the fat priest talking with Captain Aron and realises the treachery that led to Burgun`s capture...

That night, Conan heads for the temple to enact his revenge. He confronts the terrified priest, who summons the monstrous behemoth - The Bull of Anu!

The priest suddenly realises that Conan has seized his amulet, which acts as a protective charm against the Bull. The creature grabs the fat priest in a crushing grip, and having taken its sacrifice of blood, vanishes into the stars...

The young Cimmerian returns to the square, kills a sentry, cuts down the corpse of Burgun from the gallows. He slays gaurds at the city gates and takes the body of his dead comrade out for burial...

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20th Century Fantasy Poetry 0

'The King and the Oak' was one of R.E. Howard's numerous fantasy poemsWhen you mention fantasy poetry, most people think of something written in the 19th Century (if they can think of any fantasy poems at all!); poems like Coleridge's 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner', Edgar Allen Poe's 'The Raven', or Lewis Carroll's 'Jabberwocky'.But almost totally ignored is the poetry of 20th Century pulp writers and fantasists. Rarely does Tolkien's 'lays' of Beleriand, H.P. Lovecraft's 'Despair', or anything b...

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